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-Garvey, Marcus Mosiah was born August 17 1887 in St. Ann’s Bay Jamaica to Marcus Mosiah Garvey Sr., a mason and Sarah Jane Richards, a domestic worker and farmer.  He begins an apprenticeship at his godfathers printing company in 1900 and ends all formal education in 1903 after completing the sixth grade.  From 1910 to 1912, Garvey travels extensively in Central America, editing a daily newspaper in Port Limon Costa Rica and a tri-weekly paper in Colon Panama.  In 1912, Garvey moves to London to attend Birkbeck College. During his time there, Garvey travels to numerous countries throughout Europe. After returning to Jamaica in 1914, Garvey co-founds the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) and the African Communities League with Amy Ashwood.  Their motto becomes: “One God! One Aim! One Destiny!” and “Africa for Africans Home and Abroad!” Later that year, Garvey writes to Booker T. Washington for support for his movement.  Washington invites Garvey to visit Tuskegee, but passes away before they are able to meet.  Garvey arrives in the United States in 1916, settling in Harlem.  He gains a following for his movement by speaking nightly on the street corner.  In a [[http://credo.library.umass.edu/view/full/mums312-b009-i168|letter]] dated April 25, 1916, Garvey requests that W. E. B. Du Bois chair his first lecture in the United States.  A [[http://credo.library.umass.edu/view/full/mums312-b009-i167|reply]] was sent four days later stating the Du Bois would be out of town.  Garvey gave his first public lecture in May 1916, which ends with him falling off the stage!  Despite this embarrassment, Garvey perseveres, giving speaking tours across the country throughout the summer.+====== Garvey, Marcus Mosiah ====== 
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 +Marcus Mosiah Garvey was born August 17 1887 in St. Ann’s Bay Jamaica to Marcus Mosiah Garvey Sr., a mason and Sarah Jane Richards, a domestic worker and farmer.  He begins an apprenticeship at his godfathers printing company in 1900 and ends all formal education in 1903 after completing the sixth grade.  From 1910 to 1912, Garvey travels extensively in Central America, editing a daily newspaper in Port Limon Costa Rica and a tri-weekly paper in Colon Panama.  In 1912, Garvey moves to London to attend Birkbeck College. During his time there, Garvey travels to numerous countries throughout Europe. After returning to Jamaica in 1914, Garvey co-founds the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) and the African Communities League with Amy Ashwood.  Their motto becomes: “One God! One Aim! One Destiny!” and “Africa for Africans Home and Abroad!” Later that year, Garvey writes to Booker T. Washington for support for his movement.  Washington invites Garvey to visit Tuskegee, but passes away before they are able to meet.  Garvey arrives in the United States in 1916, settling in Harlem.  He gains a following for his movement by speaking nightly on the street corner.  In a [[http://credo.library.umass.edu/view/full/mums312-b009-i168|letter]] dated April 25, 1916, Garvey requests that W. E. B. Du Bois chair his first lecture in the United States.  A [[http://credo.library.umass.edu/view/full/mums312-b009-i167|reply]] was sent four days later stating the Du Bois would be out of town.  Garvey gave his first public lecture in May 1916, which ends with him falling off the stage!  Despite this embarrassment, Garvey perseveres, giving speaking tours across the country throughout the summer.
On August 17, 1918, the first issue of the UNIA’s The Negro World is published to promote nationalism and the Back to Africa movement.  Garvey argued in //The Philosophy and Opinions of Marcus Garvey// that “nationhood is the only means by which modern civilization can completely protect itself. Independence of nationality, independence of government, is the means of protecting not only the individual but the group. Nationhood is the highest ideal of all peoples.  The evolutionary scale that weighs nations and races, balances alike for peoples; hence we feel sure that someday the balance will register a change for the Negro” (5).  He also believes in the Divine Apportionment of the World, where each race is given its own country (25). On August 17, 1918, the first issue of the UNIA’s The Negro World is published to promote nationalism and the Back to Africa movement.  Garvey argued in //The Philosophy and Opinions of Marcus Garvey// that “nationhood is the only means by which modern civilization can completely protect itself. Independence of nationality, independence of government, is the means of protecting not only the individual but the group. Nationhood is the highest ideal of all peoples.  The evolutionary scale that weighs nations and races, balances alike for peoples; hence we feel sure that someday the balance will register a change for the Negro” (5).  He also believes in the Divine Apportionment of the World, where each race is given its own country (25).
 
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about/garvey_marcus_mosiah.txt · Last modified: 2012/11/14 13:10 by dkovacs
 
 
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