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Booker T. Washington was a leader, but he was never seen as an intellectual or a writer. Instead his skills were in being a political organizer and a power-broker. He was a pragmatic manipulator of political power who had a well-developed sense of the possibilities of the political and racial situation in the South, and used the power that he had to effect change in the context within which he operated. Washington focused his energies on the South, based in his belief that that was where the future of the black race resided. Eventually, Washington became an adviser to U.S. Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and Taft, both of whom harbored racist ideologies, leading many to see Washington as a tool of racial subordination. It is in this powerful position that Washington was able to exclude his critics from government jobs, university appointments, and access to philanthropic funds. Through these efforts Washington was able to give a voice to African American life on a national stage. His vision of African American progress was promoted and accepted by many leading figures of the day and inspired its fair share of critics, creating the next generation of African American leaders. His ability to form coalitions at all levels of society provided the means to educate many African Americans in the South and serves as an indelible part of African American history in the United States. Booker T. Washington was a leader, but he was never seen as an intellectual or a writer. Instead his skills were in being a political organizer and a power-broker. He was a pragmatic manipulator of political power who had a well-developed sense of the possibilities of the political and racial situation in the South, and used the power that he had to effect change in the context within which he operated. Washington focused his energies on the South, based in his belief that that was where the future of the black race resided. Eventually, Washington became an adviser to U.S. Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and Taft, both of whom harbored racist ideologies, leading many to see Washington as a tool of racial subordination. It is in this powerful position that Washington was able to exclude his critics from government jobs, university appointments, and access to philanthropic funds. Through these efforts Washington was able to give a voice to African American life on a national stage. His vision of African American progress was promoted and accepted by many leading figures of the day and inspired its fair share of critics, creating the next generation of African American leaders. His ability to form coalitions at all levels of society provided the means to educate many African Americans in the South and serves as an indelible part of African American history in the United States.
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about/washington_booker_taliaferro.txt · Last modified: 2012/11/14 13:12 by dkovacs
 
 
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