Special Collections & University Archives University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries

Results for: “Noffsinger, Mark G” (47 collections)
SCUA

Brotherhood of the Spirit (part 2)

Informal get-together, Warwick Meeting Room, 1971. Steven Wilhelm standing. Afan Cresup, Shelly Hight, Sydney Cresup, Alan Harris, Monica Palmes, unidentified. (Ref. no. car26)
Commune Kids, Warwick 1972. (Ref. no. car27)
Northfield House aerial view, 1975. (Ref. no. car28)
Photograph from National Geographic article about Connecticut River Valley, December 1971. Pictured is Shelly Hight holding Viney. Photograph in back is of Shelly’s grandmother(Ref. no. car29)
(NB: Copyright for this photo is held by National Geographic).
On the Rise Bakery crew, Orange, Mass. 1972. Marlene Schneider, Sammy Wolf, Julie Howard, Billy Schlegelmilch, Chi Chi and Nick Carson. (Ref. no. car30)
Garage Crew, Warwick, 1972. Top; Richard “Toby” Keyes (now an ordained Buddhist monk), Steve Abrahamson, and “Pancho”. Bottom; Sarah Thoren, Bernie Thoren, Jim Sullivan. (Ref. no. car31)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Warwick 1971. Vicky Locatelli and Dan Flynn. (Ref. no. car32)
Warwick Dorm, 1972. Jenny Brown and Tom Donovan in the foreground. (Ref. no. car33)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Spirit in Flesh album cover taken at the Warwick Dorm in December 1970. The band is in the foreground with the full Brotherhood membership clustered in the building. (Ref. no. car34)
Spirit in Flesh triptych, Blueberry Hill, Leyden, 1971. Bob Hincks, Michael Metelica, Joe “Pod” Podlesny. (Ref. no. car35)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Spirit in Flesh poster production. The top floor of the Warwick Dorm was the poster studio.1971. (Ref. no. car36)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Spirit in Flesh’s Roll-Royce 1972. Mark Holland and Michael Metelica. (Ref. no. car37)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Spirit in Flesh poster studio printing rare handmade Christmas cards in spelling-optional setting. Warwick 1971. Unidentified, Allan Harris, unidentified, Lynn Smith. (Ref. no. car38)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Spirit in Flesh rally in front of St. James Episcopal Church. Greenfield, 1971. (Ref. no. car39)
Spirit in Flesh poster crew in San Francisco, summer of 1971. Top; Randy Kleinrock, Andy Crystal, Richie Chapman. Bottom, local friend, Gary Hand, John Charmella, local friend, Mitch Sieser, Mike McCarty. (Ref. no. car40)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Spirit in Flesh rally in Greenwich Village, New York City, summer 1971. . (Ref. no. car41)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Free Spirit Press bus. This photograph was used for the cover of the magazine’s third issue. April 1972. (Ref. no. car42)
One of two controversial Spirit in Flesh concerts at Greenfield High School, July 1972. (Ref. no. car43)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Meeting with Michael in Warwick, summer 1972. (Ref. no. car44)
Photo by: Gary Cohen

Brotherhood of the Spirit (part 5)

Warwick group shot, 1972. (Ref. no. bin51)
Michael Metelica laughing, 1971. This photograph was in the same set as that published in the Greenfield Recorder article where he first announced his past lives as Robert E. Lee and Peter the Apostle. (Ref. no. bin52)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Bob Puckett. Northfield, 1971. (Ref. no. bin53)
Dale Sluter and Carolyn Bailey. Warwick, 1972. (Ref. no. bin54)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Afan Cresup. Northfield, 1972. (Ref. no. bin55)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Sesame…a pig. Warwick, 1970. (Ref. no. bin56)
Meditation on Blueberry Hill. Dan Pritchett, Jackie Odess, Michael Metelica, Ronnie Sellers in back. Leyden, 1971. (Ref. no. bin57)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Spirit in Flesh roadies. Doug Edson, Bob Puckett, Wally Hottel, Steve “Snagglepuss” Gross, Kenny Lennon, Donna Jagareski, Steve Barry. New York City, 1971. (Ref. no. bin58)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Frank “Unicorn” Moore and Debbie Havermael. Warwick, 1972. (Ref. no. bin59)
Warwick group shot, summer 1970. (Ref. no. bin60)
Some of the “High Time Girls” who promoted Spirit in Flesh: Lois Sellers, Betty Hottel, May Ristich, Sylvia Jordan. New Jersey, 1972. (Ref. no. bin61)
Some of the “High Time Girls.” New Jersey, 1972. (Ref. no. bin62)
Michael Metelica in concert, 1971. (Ref. no. bin64)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
“The Cersosimo Boys” — worked at Cersosimo Lumber and Sawmill in Brattleboro, VT. Richie Miller, Mitch Seiser, Scott Mangum, 1972. (Ref. no. bin65)
Spirit in Flesh Diamond Reo transport truck, 1972. (Ref. no. bin66)
Michael Metelica performing with Spirit in Flesh as rare drummer. Greenfield, 1972. (Ref. no. bin67)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Mark Holland performing with Spirit in Flesh, 1972. (Ref. no. bin68)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Phyllis Hamilton had the distinction of being the oldest member of the Brotherhood. At the time, 41 years old seemed ancient. Northfield, 1971. (Ref. no. bin69)
Spirit in Flesh mini-poster, 1972. (Ref. no. bin70)
Spirit in Flesh poster crew. Jimmy Skiathitis, Steve Gross, Bernie Thoren, Jon Haber. New York City, 1971. (Ref. no. bin71)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Spirit in Flesh doing acoustic country-western gig. Bob Hincks, Tom Howes, Michael Metelica, 1972. (Ref. no. bin72)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Michael and assorted women. Top; Nancy Newman, Debbie Stone, Ruth Miller, Doe Higgins. Middle; Carolyn Bailey, Jacquie Metelica, Michael Metelica, Betty Hottel, Kate Whittaker. Bottom; Sue Meyer, Phyllis Hamilton, May Ristich, Donna Jagareski, Laurel Sluter. Northfield, 1971. (Ref. no. bin73)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Bunny Vaughn, John Pollard, Melvin Weiner, Sue Spica in front of Free Spirit Flesh bus. Warwick, 1972. (Ref. no. bin74)
Spirit in Flesh speaker cabinet painted by Kathy Weintraub, 1972. (Ref. no. bin75)
Photo by: Gary Cohen

Brotherhood of the Spirit (part 6)

Michael Metelica in Confederate flag outfit, 1973. (Ref. no. bin76)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Michael Metelica at Hampton Beach, NH concert, 1972. (Ref. no. bin77)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Spirit in Flesh in concert at Turners Falls Airport, 1972. (Ref. no. bin78)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Michael Metelica at meeting at Warwick Dorm, 1972. (Ref. no. bin79)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Facing camera is Janice Barry and Ruth Miller, 1972. (Ref. no. bin80)
Meditation on Blueberry Hill, Leyden, 1971. (Ref. no. bin81)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Michael Metelica sitting on Heath house, 1969. (Ref. no. bin82)
“Gill House” actually in Old Northfield, 1972. (Ref. no. bin83)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Early Leyden Commune scene, 1969. (Ref. no. bin84)
Silk-screened Christmas cards at Warwick Dorm. Photo by Ron Tunison. December, 1971. (Ref. no. bin85)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Michael Metelica in concert with Spirit in Flesh, 1972. (Ref. no. bin86)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Wedding between Anne and Jim Baker at the Theater. Turners Falls, 1973. (Ref. no. bin87)
Michael Metelica in early Spirit in Flesh concert photo, 1970. . (Ref. no. bin88)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Donna Jagareski at Warwick, 1970. (Ref. no. bin89)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Spirit in Flesh in concert at Turners Falls Airport, 1972. (Ref. no. bin90)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Attic of Warwick house. Alaina Snipper and Ellen Schall, 1970. (Ref. no. bin91)
Michael Metelica in concert with Spirit in Flesh, 1972. (Ref. no. bin92)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Wedding of Chris and Wendy Garland. Charlemont, 1969. (Ref. no. bin93)
Spirit in Flesh concert at Greenfield High School on Michael’s birthday (July 26). Michael Metelica and Randy Kleinrock bringing the cake, 1972. (Ref. no. bin94)
Melvin Weiner, 1971. (Ref. no. bin95)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Elwood Babbitt, 1970. (Ref. no. bin96)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Mark Forbes, unidentified. Warwick, 1970. (Ref. no. bin97)
Jane Malinski, 1972. (Ref. no. bin98)
Kathy Murphy, backup singer for Spirit in Flesh, 1970. (Ref. no. bin99)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Bill Grabin. (Ref. no. bin100)

Brotherhood of the Spirit (part 8)

Heidi Bushell, Jacquie Metelica, Donna Jagareski, 1972. (Ref. no. bin126)
Michael McCarty, 1972. (Ref. no. bin127)
Michael and women, Northfield, 1971. Similar people as slide 4-14. (Ref. no. bin128)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Michael and Rolls-Royce, Hampton Beach, 1972. (Ref. no. bin129)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Michael Metelica at group meeting, the Dorm, summer of 1972. (Ref. no. bin130)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Heidi Bushell, Donna Jagareski, Jason Garland, Kathy Murphy, Warwick, 1972. (Ref. no. bin131)
Michael in concert with Spirit in Flesh, summer of 1972. (Ref. no. bin132)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Warwick, 1972, same people as slide 7-12. (Ref. no. bin133)
Warwick house, 1970. (Ref. no. bin134)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Debby Sonn, Jeanie Holland, Anne Messman in van, 1972. (Ref. no. bin135)
Michael in concert with Spirit in Flesh, summer of 1972. (Ref. no. bin136)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Fragment of LOOK magazine photo, July 1970. (Ref. no. bin137)
Spirit in Flesh in concert, 1972. (Ref. no. bin138)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Free Spirit Press promotional poster created by Daniel Brown and Marty Liebmann, 1973. (Ref. no. bin139)
Jim Baker, editor of the Free Spirit Press, 1973. (Ref. no. bin140)
Meeting in the Dorm, Warwick, 1971. (Ref. no. bin141)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Michael Metelica with Spirit in Flesh, 1972. (Ref. no. bin142)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Free Spirit Press paper crew on rainbow bus, 1972. Top row: Steve Wilhelm, Gordon Adams, Julie Howard, Irene White. Bottom row: Jenny Brown, Michael Scanlon, Carol Evans. (Ref. no. bin143)
(Ref. no. bin144)
Spirit in Flesh poster designed by Donna Jagareski, 1970. (Ref. no. bin145)
Brotherhood members at the Quarry, popular swimming spot. A commune right-of passage was jumping off a 40’ ledge into the water. New Hampshire, 1972. (Ref. no. bin146)
Early Spirit in Flesh promo photograph, 1970. (L-R) Paul Skiathitis, Tom Snyder, Tom Howes, “Buckwheat”, Michael Metelica, Joe Podlesny, Glenn Hutchinson, Mark Holland. (Ref. no. bin147)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Steven Heimoff, 1970. (Ref. no. bin148)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Michael Metelica, 1971. (Ref. no. bin149)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Wedding of Alan and Jane Harris, early 1973. . (Ref. no. bin150)

Collection policy

Sheep husbandry at Mass. Agricultural College
Sheep husbandry,
Mass. Agricultural College

In keeping with our mission, the Department of Special Collections and University Archives collects materials of enduring historical and cultural value relating to four major thematic areas: the history and experience of social change in America; the histories and cultures of New England with an emphasis on Massachusetts; innovation and entrepreneurship; and the broad community associated with the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Our collections are tightly integrated and span all formats, including personal papers and organizational records, books and periodicals, maps, photographs, audio and video recordings, and digital materials of all kinds, and they currently include over 35,000 printed items, approximately 30,000 linear feet of manuscript and archival materials, tens of thousands of photographs, and a burgeoning array of digital assets.

Following in the footsteps of W.E.B. Du Bois, we recognize the inherent interconnectedness of a broad range of issues in social justice and collect original materials that document the organizational, intellectual, and individual ties that unite disparate struggles for social equality, human dignity, and justice. In adopting social change as a primary collecting focus, we hope to move beyond viewing social and political movements in isolation and toward a vision that acknowledges the connections between and among them. Ultimately, we wish to lay a foundation for examining the larger histories of social engagement in America and the broader experience of social change that is difficult to encapsulate within a single social movement.

A distinctive feature of SCUA’s approach to collecting is our effort to include “whole lives and whole communities,” to provide a robust basis for interpreting the background of the persons and organizations we document, their influences, interests, and the communities in which they operate.

While not comprehensive, the following includes a brief synopsis of some of the primary focal points for SCUA’s collections:

Special Collections interests

  • Social change and movements for social change

    Emphasizing the cross-fertilization between several social movements and centers of activist energy, including peace, social and racial justice, agricultural reform, environmentalism, sustainability, labor activism, gay activism, antinuclear activism, and intentional communities, but branching out to include antifluoridation activism, campaigns for voting rights and clean elections, community and charitable organizations, and the history of revolutionary-era Europe (1789-1848).

    • African American history and culture
      The history of race and ethnicity in America, with particular emphasis on the struggle for racial equality and social justice.
    • Agriculture, horticulture, botany
      Including agricultural science and practice, horticulture, animal husbandry, natural history, organic farming, sustainable living, and heritage breeds.
    • Antinuclear movement
      SCUA holds numerous collections documenting grassroots opposition to nuclear power and nuclear weaponry.
    • Cold War Culture
      The culture of the Cold War, with an emphasis upon East Germany, Poland, and Yugoslavia. Among other areas, SCUA has a strong interest in the Solidarity movement and in partnership with the DEFA Film Library, in East German cinema and graphic arts.
    • Disability
      Organizational records and collections of personal papers documenting the history of disability and disability rights in the United States.
    • Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender issues
      Materials relating to the history and experience of the LGBTQ community and liberation struggles.
    • Labor, work, and industry
      Organized labor, industrialization, manufacturing, business history, and the experience and culture of labor and working people.
    • Peace
      Materials relating to the peace and antiwar movements and non-violence, with an emphasis on New England.
  • New England history and culture

    The social, political, cultural, intellectual, literary, and economic life, with an emphasis upon western New England. The department houses thousands of books on New England cookery, with a particular emphasis on charitable and community cookbooks and cookbooks and ephemera published by corporations and the food industry.

    • Cookery and culinary history
      SCUA has thousands of cookbooks and other materials on New England regional cuisine, including community and charitable cookbooks, commercial cookbooks by New England authors, corporate cookbooks, and culinary ephemera.
    • Literature and the arts
      Emphasizing poets and writers, playwrights, and the performing arts in New England.
    • Politics and political culture
      SCUA has rich collections documenting the history and politics of the Commonwealth, including the papers of Congressmen Silvio O. Conte and John Olver, State Senator Stanley Rosenberg, and State rep John Clark.
  • Innovation and entrepreneurship

    Materials that document innovative and entrepreneurial activities, and particularly social entrepreneurship. The collections in SCUA include the papers of Mark H. McCormack (a pioneer in sport and entertainment marketing), Carl C. Harris (inventor and President of Rodney Hunt Co.), and numerous collections that document our region’s distinctive history of innovation in manufacturing and technology.

  • UMass Amherst

    SCUA makes an effort to document the histories of the entire UMass community. Our holdings include the comprehensive official records of the University since its founding in 1863, papers of faculty, staff, and students, official and unofficial publications, oral histories, and a wide range of other collections that reflect on our history as the Commonwealth’s land grant institution.

  • Other areas

    SCUA has developed depth in a handful of other collecting areas, including:

University Archives interests

Serving as the memory of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the University Archives collects, preserves, and makes available official and non-official records documenting the policies, programs, facilities, and activities of the campus community, including its administration, departments and programs, faculty, and staff. The Archives also avidly collects materials that reflect the lives and experiences of its students and alumni.

Constitutionalism in American Life Conference

Constitutionalism in American Life Conference Collection, 1986.
1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 140

A conference hosted by the University of Massachusetts Amherst on November 7-9, 1986, that examined the impact of the Constitution on politics and government, foreign policy, race relations, and the economy, and also discussed the impact on the constitution of popular struggles and the emergence of “rights consciousness.” Includes papers presented at the conference that were to be subsequently published in a special bicentennial issue of the Journal of American History.

Subjects
  • Constitutional history--United States--Congresses
  • Constitutional law--United States--Congresses
  • Journal of American history
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--History

Conte, Silvio O. (Silvio Oltavio), 1921-1991

Silvio O. Conte Papers, 1950-1991.
389 boxes (583.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 371

Silvio Conte, 1973
Silvio Conte, 1973

Massachusetts State Senator for the Berkshire District, 1950-1958, and representative for Massachusetts’s First District in the United States Congress for 17 terms, 1959-1991, where he made significant contributions in the areas of health and human services, the environment, education, energy, transportation, and small business.

Spanning four decades and eight presidents, the papers offer an extraordinary perspective on the major social, economic, and cultural changes experienced by the American people. Includes correspondence, speeches, press releases, bill files, his voting record, committee files, scrapbooks, travel files, audio-visual materials and over 5,000 photographs and slides.

Subjects
  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--1951-
  • Massachusetts. Senate
  • United States--Politics and government--20th century
  • United States. Congress. House
Contributors
  • Conte, Silvio O. (Silvio Oltavio), 1921-1991
Types of material
  • Photographs
  • Scrapbooks
  • Sound recordings

ETHIR Fellowships in Digital Humanities

Experiential Training in Historic Information Resources (Ethir) is an initiative of the Department of Special Collections and University Archives in the UMass Amherst Libraries designed to provide students with structured, hands-on experience using and interpreting historical documentary resources. As part of our effort to integrate Special Collections more fully into the learning and research mission of the university, we offer an opportunity for select graduate students to work in the Department on a research project, while gaining first-hand experience in historical and archival praxis. Ethir fellows will take part in a range of activities in the digital humanities tied to primary source material, including curating exhibits, building digital corpora, or developing other interpretive materials.

Successful applicants will work with SCUA staff to identify a digital project that will make use of their interests and experience and that will provide a creative opportunity for building new digital skills. We ask students write a 1-2 page statement of interest outlining how their research interests might engage the department and the primary source material we collect.

Projects may include work with our collections in:

Or fellows can propose to work with a collection or topic of their choice.

Through the Ethir program, we also offer orientation for classes in any discipline that would benefit from exposure to the primary archival resources under our stewardship. Our staff are happy to work with the faculty to increase their students’ information literacy in a variety of legacy formats as well as with new digital media.

View past Ethir Fellows

Application information

Eligibility: Graduate students from any department enrolled at UMass Amherst.
Award: Graduate students from any department enrolled at UMass Amherst.
Evaluation criteria: Fellows will be selected from the pool of applicants on a competitive basis based upon: 1) a brief (1-2 page) statement of interest, 2) ability to contribute to the work of SCUA, and 3) a curriculum vita and letter of support.
Support & expectations: Fellows will receive an honorarium of $500, plus hourly compensation for 150 hours of work.
Deadline for submission: Applications must be received by April 21, 2014.
How to submit: Applications should be submitted electronically to scua [at] library.umass.edu with “ethir application” and your name in the subject line. Letters of recommendation should be sent separately to the same address.

InformationDownload the application form (rtf file).

Ethir Outcomes

For Fellows

  • Provide hands-on experience using and interpreting historical materials
  • Expose fellows to historical and archival standards and practices
  • Assist fellows in developing research projects based on primary resources
  • Increase access and provide additional scholarly layers for SCUA’s collections
  • Foster information literacy in legacy historical formats
  • Enhance learning and research at the university
  • Create web-accessible guides and exhibits that will enhance fellow’s portfolios
  • Fellows will produce tangible products for public consumption (e.g., finding aids, guides, digital collections, exhibits) based upon new or under-described collections, and they may assist in providing instruction for peers and classes

For Faculty

We will provide structured orientation for individuals and classes involving active learning, with an emphasis on:

  • Handling original materials (paleography, formats)
  • Interpreting historical content
  • Interpreting historically specific forms of information
  • Navigating the Department’s web resources
  • Translating research interests into usable queries

Francis, Robert, 1901-1987

Robert Francis Papers, 1891-1988.
17 boxes (8.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 403

Robert Francis, by Frank A. Waugh, Nov. 1939
Robert Francis, by Frank A. Waugh, Nov. 1939

The poet and essayist Robert Francis settled in Amherst, Mass., in 1926, three years after his graduation from Harvard, and created a literary life that stretched for the better part of half a century. An associate of Robert Frost and friend of many other writers, Francis occasionally worked as a teacher or lecturer, including a brief stint on the faculty at Mount Holyoke College, but he sustained himself largely through his writing, living simply in “Fort Juniper,” a cottage he built on Market Hill Road in North Amherst. A recipient of the Shelley Award (1939) and the Academy of American Poets award for distinguished poetic achievement (1984), Francis was a poet in residence at both Tufts (1955) and Harvard (1960) Universities. He died in Amherst in July 1987.

The Francis Papers contains both manuscript and printed materials, drafts and finished words, documenting the illustrious career of the poet. Of particular note is Francis’s correspondence with other writers, publishing houses, and readers, notably Paul Theroux. Also contains personal photographs and Francis family records and a small number of audio recordings of Francis reading his poetry. Letters from Francis to Regina Codey, 1936-1978, can be found in MS 314 along with two typescript poems by Francis.

connect to another siteListen to interviews with Francis on Poems to a Listener", 1977-1978
Subjects
  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Poetry--Publishing
  • Poets--Massachusetts
  • University of Massachusetts Press
Contributors
  • Brown, Rosellen
  • Ciardi, John, 1916-
  • De Vries, Peter
  • Fitts, Dudley, 1903-
  • Francis, Robert, 1901-1987
  • Hall, Donald, 1928-
  • Humphries, Rolfe
  • Moore, Marianne, 1887-1972
  • Moss, Howard, 1922-
  • Shawn, Ted, 1891-1972
  • Theroux, Paul
  • Wilbur, Richard, 1921-
Types of material
  • Audiotapes
  • Phonograph records
  • Photographs

Greenbie, Barrie B.

Barrie B. Greenbie Papers, 1934-1997.
17 boxes (19.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 142

Barrie Greenbie with g-frame model
Barrie Greenbie with g-frame model

Barrie Barstow Greenbie was a key member of the Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning at UMass Amherst from 1970-1989. In a long and remarkably diverse career, Greenbie worked as an artist with the Works Progress Administration, as a soldier and journalist, as a professor of theater, an architect, inventor, author, and landscape planner. After earning a BA in drama from the University of Miami (1953),he worked for several years in the theatre program at Skidmore College. While there, he added architecture to his array of talents, designing the East 74th Street Theater in New York in 1959, and founded a company to produce a “self-erecting” building designed to substitute for summer tent theaters. Two years after joining the faculty at UMass in 1970, he completed a doctorate in urban affairs and regional planning at the University of Wisconsin and continued with a characteristically broad array of creative pursuits, designing the William Smith Clark Memorial, among other things, and conducting an extensive aerial survey of the landscapes of the Connecticut River Valley. In monographs such as Design for Diversity and Spaces: Dimensions of the Human Landscape, Greenbie examined the interactions between humans and nature. He died at his home on South Amherst in 1998.

The Greenbie Papers document a long career as academic, writer, artist, architect, and theatrical designer. Of particular note is the extensive and engrossing correspondence, which extends from Greenbie’s years as a student at the Taft School in the late 1930s through his World War II service with the Sixth Army in the South Pacific and Japan, to his tenure at UMass Amherst (1970-1989). The collection also includes a small, but interesting correspondence between Greenbie’s parents (1918-1919).

Subjects
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning
  • World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
  • Greenbie, Barrie B
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