Special Collections & University Archives University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries

Results for: “Packer Corners Community (Vt.)” (263 collections)
SCUA

Famous Long Ago Archive

Famous Long Ago Collection, ca.1960-2005.

The barn, Montague Farm<br />Photo by Roy Finestone, Oct. 1976
The barn, Montague Farm
Photo by Roy Finestone, Oct. 1976

Ray Mungo’s Famous Long Ago (1970) and Steve Diamond’s What the Trees Said (1971) are classic visions of late 1960s counterculture and of life in New England communes. The communes on which Mungo and Diamond settled, Packer Corner and the Montague Farm, became the center of what might be considered a single extended community, embracing the Wendell Farm and Johnson Pasture and Tree Frog Farm in Vermont. The Farmers themselves were, and remain, a diverse group, including photographers, novelists, and poets, artists, actors, and activists.

An umbrella collection, the Famous Long Ago Archive contains a growing number of collections relating to the communes at Montague Farm, Packer Corners, Johnson Pasture, Wendell Farm, and Tree Frog Farm. These range from the papers of Steve Diamond, Raymond Mungo, and Jonathan Maslow to Randy Kehler and Betsy Corner (the latter of whom lived at Montague Farm), the records of the Liberation News Service, the Alternative Energy Coalition, and Musicians United for Safe Energy, to the photographic collections of Roy Finestone and Stephen Josephs. View all the Famous Long Ago Collections.

Subjects
  • Antinuclear movement--Massachusetts
  • Communal living--Massachusetts
  • Communal living--Vermont
  • Johnson Pasture Community (Vt.)
  • Montague Farm Community (Mass.)
  • Packer Corners Community (Vt.)
  • Political activists--Massachusetts

Finestone, Roy

Roy Finestone Photograph Collection, 1969-1990.
239 images
Call no.: PH 005 digital

Nina, Smoky, Chuck, Janis (Smoky and Nina on bikes)
Nina, Smoky, Chuck, Janis (Smoky and Nina on bikes)

A wave of experimentation in communal living in New England reached a peak in the late 1960s and early 1970s, with dozens of communities spread across the landscape of western Massachusetts and Vermont. Nina Finestone joined the Johnson Pastures in Guilford , Vermont, in 1969, however after the main house there went up in flames on April 16, 1970, killing four people, she joined a number of its residents who moved to the nearby Montague Farm in Montague, Massachusetts. Nina married a fellow Montague farmer, Daniel Keller, and the couple moved to Wendell in 1980.

Providing exceptional visual documentation of life at Johnson Pasture, the Montague Farm, and Wendell Farm between 1969 and 1990, the Finestone collection is centered on the lives and family of Daniel and Nina Keller. All images were taken by Roy Finestone, Nina’s father, with a medium format camera using color transparency film.

Subjects
  • Communal living--Massachusetts
  • Communal living--Vermont
  • Johnson Pasture Community (Vt.)
  • Keller, Daniel
  • Keller, Nina
  • Montague Farm Community (Mass.)
  • Wendell Farm Community (Mass.)
Contributors
  • Finestone, Roy

Slonecker, Blake, 1981-

Blake Slonecker Collection, 2008.
4 items (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 795

An historian of twentieth century social movements, Blake Slonecker received his doctorate at the University of North Carolina in 2009 and joined the history faculty at Waldorf College soon thereafter. In a dissertation examining the utopian impulses of the New Left (published in 2012 as A new dawn for the New Left: Liberation News Service, Montague Farm, and the long sixties), Slonecker explored how the political and cultural activism of the 1960s helped reshape American political culture in the decade following.

In June 2008, Slonecker conducted oral historical interviews with four individuals who were part of the extended community centered on the Montague Farm and Packer Corners communes during the late 1960s: Tom Fels, Charles Light, Sam Lovejoy, and Richard Wizansky. In wide-ranging interviews, the former communards discuss topics ranging from the fraught politics of the era, political and cultural activism, gender roles and sexuality, and daily life on the communes.

Subjects
  • Amherst College
  • Babbitt, Elwood, 1922-
  • Bloom, Marshall, 1944-1969
  • Brotherhood of the Spirit Community
  • Clamshell Alliance
  • Green Mountain Post Films
  • Johnson Pasture Community (Vt.)
  • Liberation News Service (Montague, Mass.)
  • Montague Farm Community (Mass.)
  • Musicians United for Safe Energy
  • Packer Corners Community (Vt.)
  • Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)
Contributors
  • Fels, Thomas Weston
  • Light, Charles
  • Lovejoy, Sam
  • Wizansky, Richard
Types of material
  • Audiocassettes
  • Oral histories (document genres)

Social change

Anti-war sit-in, Whitmore Hall, ca.1971
Anti-war sit-in, Whitmore Hall, ca.1971

Building upon the activist legacy of W.E.B. Du Bois, the Department of Special Collections and University Archives collects primary materials relating to individuals and groups devoted to the political, economic, spiritual, and social transformation of American society. Our intent in taking such a broad collecting scope is to view social change as a totality, rather than as isolated movements and to document how ideas about one set of social issues informs other issues, and how social causes cross-pollinate, organizationally and conceptually. By preserving a record of these activities, SCUA makes it possible for future scholars, activists, and members of the community to continue to engage with the ideas that have motivated so many.

Although our interests extend to any endeavors that reflect the efforts of individuals and groups promote social change, the collections in SCUA provide particularly valuable documentation of the movements for peace, social justice, and racial equality, environmentalism, labor activism, intentional communities, and gay rights.

View our brochure on documenting social change (pdf).


Significant collecting areas

  • Antinuclear movement
    • New England has been a hotbed of activity for the antinuclear movement, spawning groups such as the Clamshell Alliance, the Citizens Awareness Network, the Renewable Energy Media Service, and the Musicians United for Safe Energy.
  • Antiracism and civil rights
    • The Du Bois Papers document the lifelong commitment of W.E.B. Du Bois to addressing issues of racial and social injustice in the twentieth century, but SCUA houses a number of other collections that address various aspects of “the problem of the twentieth century,” and the varied approaches to its resolution. See also our research guide for African American history.
  • Community organizations and charities
    • SCUA houses the records of civic organizations involved in relief work, community assistance, and social justice.
  • Environmentalism
    • Collections relating to the history of the environment in New England and of environmentalism in the broad sense. SCUA is also interested in documenting the hsitory of land use, organic farming and sustainability, and similar topics.
  • Intentional Communities
    • Communes seemed to spring up everywhere in New England during the 1960s, but communes of various sorts have been part of our landscape for two centuries. In both its printed and manuscript collections, SCUA documents a wide variety of approaches to communal living and the cultural legacy of communes. The Famous Long Ago Archive focuses intensively on documenting a cluster of related communes in Massachusetts and Vermont, including the Montague Farm, Packer Corners, Wendell Farm, and Tree Frog Farm.
  • Labor activism
  • Peace Collections
    • Among the department’s collections documenting peace and antiwar movements, SCUA holds the records of several regional peace centers, the AFSC Western Massachusetts branch, and a number of peace activists.
  • Political activism
    • As part of its collections on political life and culture, SCUA houses collections for individuals and organizations working within the political system or against it, and several relating to Socialism and Communism and Cold-War era Eastern Europe.
  • Social Justice
    • Social justice is a catchall term that captures the complex relationships between and among a wide variety of movements for economic justice, social and civic equality. In addition to the other collecting areas listed elsewhere on this page, SCUA documents gay rights, Animal rights, prison issues, and social reform in its various guises.

Social change colloquia past

Past colloquia
Colloquium 2010: Part I (Fri. Oct. 1, 1.30 pm)
Steve Lerner: Sacrifice Zones: The Front Lines of Toxic Chemical Exposure in the United States
Lerner book cover

On Friday, October 1, Steve Lerner will talk about his new book Sacrifice Zones: The Front Lines of Toxic Chemical Exposure in the United States. The event will be held from 1.30-3pm in the Gordon Hall, 418 N. Pleasant Street, Amherst.

Across the United States, thousands of people, most of them in low-income or minority communities, live next to heavily polluting industrial sites. Many of them reach a point at which they say “Enough is enough.” In Sacrifice Zones, published by MIT Press in 2010, Steve Lerner tells the stories of twelve communities, from Brooklyn to Pensacola, that rose up to fight the industries and military bases causing disproportionately high levels of chemical pollution.

Steve Lerner is research director of Commonweal and the author of Eco-Pioneers: Practical Visionaries Solving Today’s Environmental Problems.

This event is co-sponsored by the Political Economy Research Institute’s Environmental Working Group and Special Collections & University Archives

Colloquium 2010: Part II (Thurs. Oct. 28, 6pm)
Amy Bass: Whose Broad Stripes and Bright Stars? The 1968 Olympics and the Creation of the Black Athlete.

On Thurs. October 28, Amy Bass will talk on “Whose Broad Stripes and Bright Stars? The 1968 Olympics and the Creation of the Black Athlete,” in Room 803, Campus Center, UMass Amherst. The event is co-sponsored by the Feinberg Family Lecture Series organized by the UMass Amherst Department of History, and is free and open to the public.

Amy Bass is professor of history at the College of New Rochelle. She is the author of Not the Triumph But the Struggle: 1968 Olympics and the Making of the Black Athlete and Those About Him Remained Silent: The Battle over W. E. B. Du Bois. She is the editor of In the Game: Race, Identity, and Sports in the Twentieth Century. Bass has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in history from Stony Brook University. Her research interests include African American history, modern American culture, identity politics, and historical theory and methodology. She has served as research supervisor for the NBC Olympic unit at the Atlanta, Sydney, Salt Lake, Athens, and Torino Olympic Games.

Dr. Bass’s talk will explore the black power protest at the Mexico City Olympic Games by Americans Tommie Smith and John Carlos in 1968. Their moment on the victory dais effectively linked American sports and racial politics in the U.S. She will examine how the black power protest in Mexico became the defining image of the 1968 Olympics. She will also explore how the Olympic Project for Human Rights mobilized black athletes to assume a new set of responsibilities alongside their athletic prowess, forcing Americans, and the world, to reconsider the role of sports within civil rights movements.

2009 (Oct. 29): A Conversation
Raymond Mungo, 1968
Speaker:
Raymond Mungo
Raymond Mungo was a key figure in the literary world of the late 1960s counterculture. A founder of the Liberation News Service — an alternative press agency that distributed news reflecting a left-oriented, antiwar, countercultural perspective — Mungo moved to Vermont during the summer of 1968 and settled on a commune. A novelist and writer, his first book, Famous Long Ago: My Life and Hard Times With Liberation News Service (1970) is considered a classic account of the countercultural left, and his follow-up Total Loss Farm (1971), based on his experiences on the Packer Corners commune, was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. Mungo has written several novels, screenplays, dozens of essays, and hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles during a literary career of more than four decades. For the past ten years, he has worked as a social worker in Los Angeles, tending primarily to AIDS patients and the severely mentally ill.
Todd Gitlin
While a college student in the early 1960s, Todd Gitlin rose to national prominence as a writer and theorist of the New Left. A president of Students for a Democratic Society in 1963-1964, he was a central figure in the civil rights and antiwar movements, helping to organize the first national mobilization against the war in Vietnam, the March on Washington of 1965. After receiving degrees from the University of Michigan and the University of California Berkeley, Gitlin joined the faculty at Columbia University, where he is currently Professor of Journalism and Sociology and Chair of the doctoral program in Communications. Over the past thirty years, he has written extensively on mass communication, the media, and journalism. The author of twelve books, Gitlin is today a noted public intellectual and prominent critic of both the left and right in American politics, arguing that pragmatic coalition building should replace ideological purity and criticizing the willingness of those on both sides to use violence to reach ends to power.
Talk II:
Thurs, Oct. 29, 2009, 4 p.m., Blake Slonecker, Assistant Professor of History at Waldorf College, will present a talk, “Living the Moment: Liberation News Service, Montague Farm, and the New Left, 1967-1981.
2008 (Oct. 30): Then and Now: Sixties Activism and New Realities
Speaker:
Junius Williams
Writer and activist.
Parker Donham
Journalist and former press secretary for Eugene McCarthy


2007 (Oct. 30): Fifty Years of Radical Activism: An Evening with Tom Hayden
Speaker:
Tom Hayden
Fmr President of Students for a Democratic Society
Tom Hayden

For nearly fifty years, Tom Hayden’s name has been synonymous with social change. As a founding member of the Students for a Democratic Society in 1961, he was author of its visionary call, the Port Huron Statement, the touchstone for a generation of activists. As a Freedom Rider in the Deep South in the early 1960s, he was arrested and beaten in rural Georgia and Mississippi. As a community organizer in Newark’s inner city in 1964, he was part of an effort to create a national poor people’s campaign for jobs and empowerment.

When the Vietnam War invaded American lives, Hayden became a prominent voice in opposition, organizing teach-ins and demonstrations, writing, and making one of the first trips to Hanoi in 1965 to meet with the other side. One of the leaders of the street demonstrations against the war at the 1968 Chicago Democratic Convention, he was one of eight organizers indicted — and eventually acquitted — on charges of conspiracy and incitement.

After the political system opened in the 1970s, Hayden organized the grass-roots Campaign for Economic Democracy in California, which won dozens of local offices and shut down a nuclear power plant through a referendum for the first time. He was elected to the California state assembly in 1982, and the state senate ten years later, serving eighteen years in all, and he has twice served on the national platform committee of the Democratic Party.


2007 (Oct. 30): The Sixties: The Way We Really Were
Panelists:
Johnny Flynn, Tim Koster, Sheila Lennon, Karen Smith

As part of its annual Colloquium on Social Change, the Department of Special Collections and University Archives of UMass Amherst presents a panel discussion and readings from a new book, Time it Was: American Stories from the Sixties, a set of short memoirs written by people who participated in a wide variety of Sixties-era movements and events. Join us for speakers Johnny Flynn (American Indian Movement), Sheila Lennon (Woodstock), Tim Koster (Draft Lottery “Winner” and Conscientious Objector), and Karen Manners Smith, who spent five years in a religious cult.

For students, the readings and discussion provide an opportunity to hear stories that move beyond Sixties mythology towards an appreciation of the real — but no less exciting — experiences of young people in that tumultuous era. Non-students and members of the Five College and surrounding communities will find this panel discussion a chance to reconnect with their own memories of the period.


2006: Building the Left in the Age of the Right: Developing a Lifetime Commitment
Speakers:
Eric Mann and Lian Hurst Mann
Labor/Community Strategy Center, Los Angeles
Flier announcing the event (pdf)


2005: Crossroads: A Colloquium on Social Change
Speakers:
Carl Oglesby
Writer, antiwar activist, former President of SDS
Tom Fels

Curator, writer, fmr resident of Montague Farm Commune
Catherine Blinder
Activist, writer, fmr resident of Tree Frog Farm Commune
Flier announcing the event (pdf)

2001 Center/Renaissance Community

2001 Center sign painted by Alaina Snipper, 1976 (Ref. no. car93)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
“Mayday” concert at 2001 Center, Gill, May 1, 1976. Sponsored by WAAF radio, 3000 people were planned for, 14,000 arrived. Community provided all security, medical, sound personnel, parking, food concessions and cleanup. (Ref. no. car94)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
“Mayday” concert at 2001 Center, Gill, May 1, 1976. (Ref. no. car95)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
“Mayday” concert at 2001 Center, Gill, May 1, 1976. (Ref. no. car96)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
“Mayday” concert at 2001 Center, Gill, May 1, 1976. (Ref. no. car97)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
“Mayday” concert at 2001 Center, Gill, May 1, 1976. (Ref. no. car98)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
“Mayday” concert at 2001 Center, Gill, May 1, 1976. (Ref. no. car99)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
“Mayday” concert at 2001 Center, Gill, May 1, 1976. (Ref. no. car100)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
“Mayday” concert at 2001 Center, Gill, May 1, 1976. (Ref. no. car101)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
God’s Eye weaving by Laura Sieser at the 2001 Center, Gill, 1979. (Ref. no. car102)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Doug Edson, 2001 Center. Gill, 1979. (Ref. no. car103)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Beginning construction on Michael’s planned house, 2001 Center, Gill, 1979. (Ref. no. car104)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
The Barn under construction with a planned meeting room upstairs and Community Office downstairs. Gill, 1979. (Ref. no. car105)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Brian McCue’s house under construction. Gill, 1977. (Ref. no. car106)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Detail of Brian McCue house construction. Gill, 1978. (Ref. no. car107)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Work on the Barn with Betsy Sullivan. Gill, 1980. (Ref. no. car108)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Nursery at Northfield House, 1976. Adults are Lois Sellers and Larry Raffel. (Ref. no. car109)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
View of Community garden from tower of Michael’s house. Gill, 1980 (Ref. no. car110)
Photo by: Daniel Brown

2001 Center/Renaissance Community (part 2)

Marilyn Dowling and friends. Gill, 1982. (Ref. no. car111)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Community Schoolgirls. Swan Keyes, unidentified, Dixie Sellers, Lorelei Jaquay, Elka Holland. Gill, 1981. (Ref. no. car112)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Community Food Coop with Cheryl Senior. Gill, June, 1979. (Ref. no. car113)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Mobile Feast food concession at Getting to the Same Place spiritual festival. Chi-Chi Tolda, Deborah Stone, Donna Oehmig, Steve Wolfson in foreground. New Hampshire, May 1979. (Ref. no. car114)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Silver Screen Design t-shirt concession. Chris Garland and Donna Jagareski. Camelot Festival, 1976. (Ref. no. car115)
Renaissance Rockets baseball team. Back row; Jim Sullivan, Mitch Sieser, David Senior, Randy Kleinrock, Phil Dowling, Kenny Johnson. Bottom row; Jimmy Skiathitis, Marvin Moss, Gary Cohen, Steve Miller, Steve Greenwald, Mark Alvin. Turners Falls, 1979. (Ref. no. car116)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
ICRY [Inner-City Roundtable of Youth] visit. Members flanked by May Ristich and Michael Rapunzel. Gill, 1980. (Ref. no. car117)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Laurie Cabot, “The Witch of Salem” at the Noble Feast with Robin Paris and May Ristich. Turners Falls, February, 1978. (Ref. no. car118)
Peter Caddy, founder of the Findhorn Community with Michael Rapunzel. Old Stone Lodge, Gill, 1979. (Ref. no. car119)
Peter Caddy giving lecture at the Theater. Turners Falls, 1978 (Ref. no. car120)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Community morning breakfast at the Noble Feast. David and Donna Jagareski, Mitch Sieser, Guy Pollard, unidentified men at right. Turners Falls, 1977. (Ref. no. car121)
Community dinner at the Noble Feast. John Charmella, Richard “Brau” Safft, Irene, Eleanor, and Alan Berwick. Turners Falls, 1979. (Ref. no. car122)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Community visit to the “Abode of the Message” center at a time of increased networking between local spiritual communities. Upstate New York, 1989. (Ref. no. car123)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Morning meditation at the 2001 Center. Gill, 1981. (Ref. no. car124)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Greeting Card. Marilyn Dowling and Melvin Weiner. 1978. (Ref. no. car125)
Country Western outfits popular with Michael’s entourage. Guy Pollard, Doug Edson, Michael Rapunzel, unidentified. Gill, 1979. (Ref. no. car126)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Community group shot. The Barn. Gill, 1981. (Ref. no. car127)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Saturday Work Day project. Gill, 1983. (Ref. no. car128)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Planting seeds in Community garden. John Charmella, Robin Paris. Gill, 1980. (Ref. no. car129)
Photo by: Daniel Brown

2001 Center/Renaissance Community (part 3)

Nursery outing; kids with Larry Raffel, November, 1976 (Ref. no. bin257)
House eventually belonging to the Edson family, 1983. (Ref. no. bin258)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Greenhouse at Brian McCue’s house, June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin259)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Michael Rapunzel on [unknown] TV talk show, 1977. (Ref. no. bin260)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Donna Liebmann performing at local festival on land, 1977. (Ref. no. bin261)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Michael Rapunzel and Steven Greenwald’s house under construction, August, 1979. (Ref. no. bin262)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Noble Feast interior. Turners Falls, 1978. (Ref. no. bin263)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Construction detail of Michael’s house, 1980. (Ref. no. bin264)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Frog Hunters at the swimming hole. Ariel Brown and Zach Vaughn, July, 1983. (Ref. no. bin265)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Jim Sullivan, 1979. (Ref. no. bin266)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Noble Feast exterior. Turners Falls, 1977. (Ref. no. bin267)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Greenhouse interior at Brian McCue’s house. June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin268)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Long view of the Lodge. June, 1981. (Ref. no. bin269)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
View of the Warwick house. House in rear is on the site of the former Dorm. Warwick, 1988. (Ref. no. bin270)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Swimming hole at 2001 Center. August, 1982. (Ref. no. bin271)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Gladiolas in bloom near McCue house. July, 1982. (Ref. no. bin272)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Frog Hunters in action. Ariel Brown, Crymson Sullivan, Krishna Lennon. May, 1982. (Ref. no. bin273)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Andrew Bush and friend. June 1983. (Ref. no. bin274)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Working in the garden between Michael and McCue houses. June, 1982. (Ref. no. bin275)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
McCue’s house. June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin276)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
View of Marilyn Dowling’s garden between Michael and McCue houses. June, 1983 (Ref. no. bin277)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance members celebrating at Getting to the Same Place festival. New Hampshire, May, 1979. (Ref. no. bin278)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
ICRY [Inner-City Roundtable of Youth], New York City street gang organization gathering at Lodge, 1981. (Ref. no. bin279)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Alan Harris in Punk-phase, Marilyn Dowling outside the Barn, 1982. (Ref. no. bin280)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
2001 Center cornfield, 1981. (Ref. no. bin281)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Frolic by the swimming hole. May, 1982. (Ref. no. bin282)
Photo by: Daniel Brown

2001 Center/Renaissance Community (part 4)

The Lodge, 1982. (Ref. no. bin283)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
McCue house. August, 1983. (Ref. no. bin284)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Peter and Eileen Caddy, founders of Findhorn Community, with Michael Rapunzel. The Lodge, June, 1976. (Ref. no. bin285)
The Barn, 1981. (Ref. no. bin286)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Doug Edson, 1979. (Ref. no. bin287)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Barn construction with Steve Miller, 1980. (Ref. no. bin288)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Marilyn Dowling working on Michael’s house, 1979. (Ref. no. bin289)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Woodpile. The Lodge was heated by a wood furnace. May, 1979. (Ref. no. bin290)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Meeting on the ridge above Lodge. August, 1982. (Ref. no. bin291)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Pumpkin field below Michael’s house. September, 1981. (Ref. no. bin292)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Rocket’s Silver Train bus with Justin Jaquay, 1979. (Ref. no. bin293)
McCue house under construction, 1977. (Ref. no. bin294)
Peter Caddy with Michael Rapunzel before lecture in Theater. Turners Falls, 1979. (Ref. no. bin295)
Margie McClure, Ivan Senior, Betsy Sullivan, Karen Barry, 1981. (Ref. no. bin296)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Mobile Feast food concession at Supersession concert. Renee Fenner, Steve Wolfson. July, 1977 (Ref. no. bin297)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Evening at the swimming hole, 1982. (Ref. no. bin298)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Cornfield in bloom, August 1981. (Ref. no. bin299)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Saturday Work Day project at the Lodge, August, 1982. (Ref. no. bin300)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Cheryl Termo with kids. June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin301)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Office in Barn with Sandra Jaquay-Wilson. (Ref. no. bin302)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Tilling the land with Bill Stone on tractor. April, 1983. (Ref. no. bin303)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Class of 1981. (Ref. no. bin304)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Garden scene, 1983. (Ref. no. bin305)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Sunday morning at the Lodge. Debby Stone, Bill and Monica Grabin, 1979. (Ref. no. bin306)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Barn under construction, 1979. (Ref. no. bin307)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Greeting Cards booth at trade show with Melvin Weiner. New York City, 1979. (Ref. no. bin308)
Photo by: Daniel Brown

2001 Center/Renaissance Community (part 5)

Silver Screen Design office with Ruth Miller and Margie McClure. Turners Falls, 1979. (Ref. no. bin309)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Joanne Santos with goats, June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin310)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
May Ristich, Robin Paris, Gale Jensen, 1983. (Ref. no. bin311)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Emily Babbitt and May Ristich. June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin312)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Findhorn founder, Dorothy McLean lecturing in Theater with Bill Grabin. Turners Falls, 1978. (Ref. no. bin313)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Cheryl Termo, business manager of Silver Screen Design. Turners Falls, 1983. (Ref. no. bin314)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Digging out the swimming hole. Lois Sellers and Michael Rapunzel, 1981. (Ref. no. bin315)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Kids at the Lodge; Lamia Holland, Zach Vaughn, Elka Holland. September, 1982. (Ref. no. bin316)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Painters working in Roxbury, Mass. housing project. Spencer Liebmann and Renee Fenner. December, 1977. (Ref. no. bin317)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Debby Edson with newborn Daniel and unidentified, 1982. (Ref. no. bin318)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Lois Sellers working on the Barn, 1981. (Ref. no. bin319)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Steve Greenwald working on his house, 1979. (Ref. no. bin320)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Concert at Unity Park. Turners Falls, 1978. (Ref. no. bin321)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Laura Berg, Chris Garland, Melvin Weiner. Supersession concert, New Hampshire. July, 1977. (Ref. no. bin322)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
(Ref. no. bin323)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Irene and Eleanor Berwick in the garden. July, 1982. (Ref. no. bin324)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Nursery kids at the Lodge. August, 1980. (Ref. no. bin325)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Theater after meditation. Linda Ladd, John Charmella, Cheryl Termo with Che. Turners Falls, December, 1977. (Ref. no. bin326)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Noble Feast salad crew. Unidentified, Jane Harris, Rena Saperstein. Turners Falls, May 1979. (Ref. no. bin327)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Mobile Feast food concession. June 1979. (Ref. no. bin328)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Kids at festival on land, August, 1977. (Ref. no. bin329)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Annie Charest and Randy Tuttle, 1981. (Ref. no. bin330)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Logging crew, 1980. (Ref. no. bin331)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Wedding of Debby and Doug Edson. July, 1981. (Ref. no. bin332)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Robin Paris and May Ristich. August, 1979. (Ref. no. bin333)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Marvin and Kathy Murphy-Moss with Luke, 1979. (Ref. no. bin334)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Misty Barn. June, 1979. (Ref. no. bin335)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Saturday Work Day project cutting wood . June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin336)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Marilyn Dowling preparing greenhouse at McCue house. March, 1983. (Ref. no. bin337)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
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