Special Collections & University Archives University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries

Inglis, David R.

David R. Inglis Papers, 1929-2003 (Bulk: 1946-1980).
12 boxes (5.75 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 033

David R. Inglis at Argonne N.L., ca.1953
David R. Inglis at Argonne N.L., ca.1953

David R. Inglis enjoyed a distinguished career in nuclear physics that ranged from theoretical work on the structure of the nucleus in the 1930s to the development of the atomic bomb in the 1940s and work on renewable energy in the 1960s and 1970s. A Professor of Physics at UMass from 1969-1975, Inglis was a founding member of the Federation of American Scientists and from the mid-1940s on, he dedicated himself to informing public policy on the dangers of nuclear technologies.

The Inglis Papers offer a perspective on the life and career of a theoretical physicist who grew from an early involvement in the Manhattan Project to becoming a committed critic of nuclear weaponry and nuclear power. Although the collection is relatively sparse in unpublished scientific work, it includes valuable correspondence relating to Inglis’s efforts with the Federation of American Scientists and other organizations to influence public policy on issues relating to disarmament and nuclear power.

Biographical Note

A namesake and descendent of David Rittenhouse, one of early America’s preeminent physical scientists, David R. Inglis enjoyed a career in nuclear physics that ranged from theoretical work on the structure of the nucleus in the 1930s to the development of the atomic bomb in the 1940s to the protracted struggle against nuclear weaponry and nuclear power. Born in Detroit, Michigan, on October 10, 1905, Inglis graduated from Amherst College (1928) before receiving his doctorate from the University of Michigan in 1931 for a dissertation on energy relations in complex spectra.

Like many ambitious young scientists of his generation, Inglis traveled abroad to strengthen his credentials. Well versed in current issues in the field from having attended the series of symposia on theoretical physics held in Ann Arbor, Inglis spent a year in Heidelberg, immersing himself in the rapidly developing field of quantum mechanics. When he returned to the States in 1933, however, he found himself in a state of academic vagabondage, passing through a succession of faculty positions at Ohio State (where he met and married Dorothy Kerr), Pittsburgh, and Princeton before landing at Johns Hopkins in 1938. There, he devoted himself to developing a program in experimental nuclear physics while conducting significant research on the nature of spin-orbit coupling in 7Li. When later confirmed, this work is believed, as Hanna et al. (1997) report, to represent the first assignment of an excited nuclear level based on a microscopic quantum mechanical theory.

Inglis’ tenure at Hopkins was interrupted by wartime service with the Ballistics Research Laboratory at Aberdeen Proving Grounds (1943) and the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos Laboratory, N.M. (1943-1946). He returned to civilian life in 1946 and to his work on atomic structure and angular distribution studies, but the war was clearly a watershed in the development of his commitment to what he called public affairs. Having gained an insider’s perspective on nuclear annihilation, he gradually turned against nuclear power. Joining the Argonne National Laboratory as a senior scientist in 1949, Inglis spent two decades in the development of peaceful uses for nuclear power, but more notably, he emerged as a prominent figure in the nuclear disarmament movement. As a founding member of the Federation of American Scientists and participant in the Pugwash conferences during the 1950s and 1960s, Inglis was an prominent voice for rationality in discussions of nuclear weaponry. As early as 1951, he called for the creation of a federal agency for arms control and disarmament (not established for another nine years later), and both in congress and before the public, he lobbied steadily for nuclear disarmament and for a partial nuclear test ban (approved in 1963), and against nuclear proliferation and the development of antiballistic missiles. A series of articles he published in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Saturday Review, and the New Republic were influential in raising public awareness of the dire implications of radioactive fallout, the hydrogen bomb, and the complexities of international arms control.

After retiring from Argonne and joining the faculty at UMass Amherst in 1969, Inglis’ activism expanded to include a concern with American energy policy. Calling attention to the critical problems of global dependence on fossil fuels and the dubious safety of nuclear reactors and long-term waste storage, Inglis became an advocate for alternative energy, particularly wind power, writing several books and chapters on nuclear and alternative energy. He felt a strong responsibility, as he wrote, for establishing a dialogue between scientists and the public as the best means of preserving democracy.

A highly prolific writer, Inglis contributed dozens of articles both in theoretical physics and public affairs over the course of his career, and was recipient of a number of honors and awards, including honorary degrees from Amherst College (1963) and the University of Illinois (1973), and the Leo Szilard Award for Physics in the Public Interest (1974) for his work on the social and strategic implications of nuclear energy. Inglis retired from UMass in 1975 and over the last several years of his life, continued occasionally to contribute to public debates. Inglis and his wife Betty (Dorothy) moved into the Applewood retirement community in September 1991. Betty died in 1993, followed by David died on December 3, 1995.

Scope and contents of the collection
Betty and David Inglis, June 1992

Betty and David Inglis, June 1992

The papers of David R. Inglis offer a perspective on the life and career of a theoretical physicist who grew from an early involvement in the Manhattan Project to becoming a committed critic of nuclear weaponry and nuclear power. Although the collection is relatively sparse in unpublished scientific work, it includes outstanding correspondence relating to Inglis’s work with the Federation of American Scientists and other organizations, and his efforts to influence public policy on issues relating to nuclear power. The collection also includes the majority of Inglis’ scientific publications and his published contributions on public affairs, as well as selected subject files, course notes, and lab notes. The later materials in the collection reflect Inglis’s late-career work in alternative energy.

Among the collection’s highlights are copies of notes distributed at Los Alamos University in 1945-1946, including Teller and Konopinski on quantum mechanics and Schiff and Baroody on statistical mechanics; Inglis’ notes from his work at Argonne National Laboratories; and a six part oral history conducted with Inglis in 1989, looking back at his career.


Information on Use
Terms of Access and Use
Restrictions on access:

The collection is open for research.

Preferred Citation

Please use the following format when citing materials from this collection:

David Rittenhouse Inglis Papers (FS 033). Special Collections and University Archives, W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst.

History of the Collection

Acquired from David R. Inglis, 1984, 1994.


Additional Information

Language
English.

Bibliography
Hanna, Stanley S., Dieter Kurath, and Gerald A. Peterson, “David Rittenhouse Inglis,” Physics Today 50, 6 (1997): 109-110.


Series Descriptions
1945-2003
1.25 linear ft.

Although the series contains few letters on purely scientific matters, Inglis’s correspondence is a rich and valuable resource for study of the social and political turmoil afflicting the American nuclear physics community from the end of the Second World War to the early 1960s. With a distinctly liberal conscience, Inglis was deeply immersed in professional organizations responding to controversies over loyalty issues and security clearances during the early years of the Cold War, and beginning in the mid-1950s, he took a leading and — at least for some co-workers at Argonne National Laboratory — controversial role as an advocate for non-proliferation, disarmament, and a nuclear test ban.

Of particular note, Inglis’s correspondence contains an interesting and important series of letters documenting Inglis’s work with the Federation of American Scientists from 1946-1960, and less extensive correspondence relating to his activities with the World Association of World Federalists and the World Federation of Scientific Workers. Founded in 1945 by scientists from the Manhattan Project, the FAS regularly addressed key issues in American public policy, especially with regard to the potential dangers of nuclear weaponry and other scientific and technical advances. The series also contains interesting correspondence relating to Inglis’s lobbying efforts for nuclear disarmament, including letters to and from public officials from President Dwight Eisenhower to Senators Everett Dirksen, Hubert Humphrey, and Paul Douglas, and the editorial boards of several newspapers and magazines.

Also worthy of note are letters and documents pertaining to the establishment of the Midwest Nuclear Theorists’s Group and the Nuclear Theorists’s Group at Argonne National Laboratory, and some correspondence relating to the possibility of siting nuclear reactors underground, including a fine letter from Edward Teller.

1929-1976
2.25 linear ft.

Materials associated with Inglis, primarily during his . Inglis’ increasing interest in disarmament is reflected in SIPRI.

The series also includes correspondence from Inglis’ publishers regarding his book Nuclear Energy Its Physics and Social Challenge (including some interesting reviewers’ comments on the manuscript), from the editors at Encyclopedia Britannica regarding his entry on the atomic nucleus, and drafts and notes on several of his articles on disarmament and related topics. The materials relating to Inglis’ involvement in two UMass Amherst initiatives — the Global Survival Program (1972-1973) and the review committee for the Institute for Man and His Environment (1971-1974) — offer some insight into faculty efforts during the early 1970s.

Finally, the series includes a useful series of spiral-bound research notes kept by Inglis during his period at the Argonne National Laboratory (1955-1968) and as a visiting scientist at CERN (1957-1959).

1945-1965
0.5 linear ft.

Mimeograph and other copies of notes distributed for courses attended by Inglis on topics in nuclear physics. Of particular interest are notes from two courses taken at “Los Alamos University,” formed by Hans Bethe and Enrico Fermi during the last days of the Manhattan Project: Teller and Konopinski’s “Introduction to Quantum mechanics” and Schiff and Baroody’s “Statistical Mechanics.”

1929-1980
0.5 linear ft.

Reprints of technical and “public affairs” articles by Inglis from throughout his career. The articles, mostly reprints and offprints, are filed alphabetically by title.

1989
1.0 linear ft.

In 1989, Inglis agreed to take part in an extensive series of oral history interviews, discussing his perspective on the history of nuclear physics since the 1920s, with particular focus on the development of nuclear weaponry and nuclear power. The videotapes have been transcribed (see Ser. 1: Oral History) and edited.

The series also includes a dvd of Inglis lecturing to Allan R. Hoffman’s undergraduate, non-major course at UMass on energy and arms control, where he discusses the Manhattan Project and the atomic bombing of Japan.

Contents List
Series 1. Correspondence
1946-1981
1.5 linear ft.
Ajzenberg, Fay
1953
Box 1:1
Allison, Samuel K.
1951
Box 1:2

Letters between Allison (Univ. of Chicago) and Louis A. Turner (Argonne) re: Robert Oppenheimer case and the upcoming International Conference.

Alsop, Joseph
1960
Box 1:3
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
1958
Box 1:4

William Davidon plans a summer study on international arms control.

American Friends Service Committee
1953-1960
Box 1:5

Includes draft of “An appeal to President Eisenhower” and press release regarding Formosa Straits crisis.

Anderson, Clinton P.
1959-1960
Box 1:6

Re: international nuclear test ban. Includes copy of “Policies for a Nuclear Future” (press release from Sen. Anderson’s remarks) and “Statement of Senator Clinton P. Anderson on Russian Test Ban Proposal.”

Appeal to the British Physicists Against Hydrogen-bomb Testing by the Undersigned Japanese Physicists
1957
Box 1:7
Argonne National Laboratory. Nuclear Theory Working Group
1962-1963
Box 1:8

Correspondence and memos regarding organization of the group, including 2 TLsS from Eugene Wigner, TLS from Aage Bohr, Akito Arima, Arthur K. Kerman, and Richard Ferrell.

Argonne National Laboratory, Plan of Organization and Statement of Operating Policy
1946 June 14
Box 1:9
Arima, Akito
1962
Box 1:10
Association of Scientists for Atomic Education
1946-1948
Box 1:11

Includes “Policy guide for atomic education.”

Austern, Norman
1956-1963
Box 1:12
Baltimore Association of Scientists. Constitution
Undated
Box 1:13
Bayman, Benjamin
1966
Box 1:14
Bethe, Hans newspaper clipping
Undated
Box 1:15
Bloch, Robert
1955
Box 1:16

Offprint of article, “On responsibility of scientists,” signed by Bloch.

Bohr, Aage
1962
Box 1:17

Letter to Bohr on summer plans.

Bouchez, Robert
1970
Box 1:18
Bradbury, Norris E.
1946
Box 1:19

Memo from Inglis on “Philosophy of the Laboratory” and future development of weapons [Los Alamos]

Breit, Gregory
1949
Box 1:20
Brown, Harrison
1958
Box 1:21

Statement before the Senate Subcommittee on Disarmament.

Brueckner, Keith
1961
Box 1:22

Re: Institute for Defense Analyses.

Cahn, Anne H.
1970
Box 1:23
Chandrasekhar, S.
1953
Box 1:24
Chicago Committee on a Sane Nuclear Policy
1959
Box 1:25

See also National Committee on a Sane Nuclear Policy.

Chicago Daily News
1959
Box 1:26

Letter to the editor re: nuclear test ban.

Church, Frank
1960
Box 1:27
Cockroft, J. D.
1950
Box 1:28

Re: International Nuclear Physics Conference.

Cole, Michael
1962
Box 1:29
Collins, Thomas
1960
Box 1:30

Re: writing an editorial on nuclear policy in the Chicago Daily News.

Compton, Arthur H.
1952-1953
Box 1:31
Condon, E. U.
1954
Box 1:32

Statement of support concerning Condon in obtaining security clearance.

Conferences
1951-1974
Box 1

Correspondence, programs, and other organizational material relating to scientific conferences.

Conferences
1951-1961
Box 1:33
Conferences
1962-1964
Box 1:34
Conferences
1965-1968
Box 1:35
Conferences
1969-1974
Box 1:36
Court, Andrew T.
1958
Box 1:37
Cromer, Alan H.
1959
Box 1:38
Darrow, Karl K.
1954-1956
Box 1:39

American Physical Society conferences.

Dieke, G. H.
1948
Box 1:40
Dirksen, Everett M.
1959
Box 1:41
Disarmament
1957-1960
Box 1:42

Includes letter to Senate Subcommittee on Disarmament, Statement by 18 German Physicists Barring Work on Nuclear Weapons (1957); Dept. of State Press Release re: Soviet experts in Geneva (1959); “A scientific approach to the disarmament problem,” Address delivered by M. Mooney at a luncheon of the Society of Rheology, 1959; Recommendations from a Conference to Plan a Strategy for Peace, Arden House, 1960.

Disarmament Background Series
1957-1958
Box 1:43

Press releases from White House Disarmament Staff.

Douglas, Paul
1959
Box 1:44
Duerr, Hans Peter
1957
Box 1:45
Dulles, John Foster
1953
Box 1:46

Disarmament (from Federation of American Scientists).

Dyson, Freeman
1960
Box 1:47

Re: Hans Bethe and prospect of a fission-free bomb.

Dynamo theory of the earth’s magnetic field
1981
Box 1:48
Eisenhower, Dwight D.
1959
Box 1:49

Press release from the White House on the detection and identification of underground nuclear tests.

Elliott, L. G.
1953
Box 1:50
Farley, Philip J.
1958-1959
Box 1:51

Includes notes on the Fourth Country Problem.

Federation of American Scientists
1946-1960
Box 1

Re: issues over loyalty, House Un-American Activities Committee, the atomic bomb, and some organizational information on Baltimore chapter of FAS.

Federation of American Scientists
1946-1947
Box 1:52
Federation of American Scientists
1948 Jan.-July
Box 1:53
Federation of American Scientists
1948 Aug.-Dec.
Box 1:54

Much on civilian vs military control of the atomic bombs; loyalty problems and clearance, the E.U. Condon case; Scientists Committee on Loyalty Problems; House Un-American Activities Committee.

Federation of American Scientists
1949
Box 1:55
Federation of American Scientists
1951
Box 1:56
Federation of American Scientists
1952
Box 1:57

E.U. Condon case; McCarthy; House Un-American Activities Committee.

Federation of American Scientists
1953
Box 1:58

Disarmament.

Federation of American Scientists
1957
Box 1:59
Federation of American Scientists
1960
Box 1:60
Federation of American Scientists. Scientists’ Committee on Loyalty Problems
1948
Box 1:61
Ferrell, Richard A.
1962
Box 1:62
Flanders, Donald A.
1952
Box 1:63
Fohl, Lois
1958
Box 1:64
Foster, Henry
1974
Box 1:65
Fowler, John M.
1959
Box 1:66
French, J. Bruce
1957-1963
Box 1:67
Gerjuoy, E.
1953
Box 2:1
Ghiorso, Albert
1962-1963
Box 2:2
Gold, Louis
1950
Box 2:3
Goldberger, Arnold
1961
Box 2:4
Gove, Harry E.
1957
Box 2:5
Graff, Robert
1971
Box 2:6
Guth, Eugene. Blueprint for peace
Undated
Box 2:7
Hafner, Everett Mark
1954
Box 2:8
Halliday, David
1952-1957
Box 2:9
Harpers Magazine
1959
Box 2:10
Hellund, Emil
1954
Box 2:11

Correspondence with and about Hellund, a colleague imprisoned on an unspecified morals charge seeking Inglis’s help finding a position as theoretical physicist.

Herter, Christian
1960
Box 2:12
Hough, Paul V. C.
1953
Box 2:13
Hudspeth, Emmett L.
1954
Box 2:14
Humphrey, Hubert H.
1958-1960
Box 2:15

Correspondence (to Humphrey) and press releases relating to disarmament and test ban.

Ichimura, Munetake
1967
Box 2:16
Indiana University
1963
Box 2:17
Inglis, David R. Certificate of participation in the Manhattan Project
1945 Aug. 6
Box 2:18
Inglis, David R. Notes and drafts of letters regarding nuclear weapons
1960
Box 2:19

Includes photocopy of Freeman Dyson’s “Future development of nuclear weapons.”

Inglis, David R. Notes on pear-shaped nuclei
ca.1955
Box 2:20
Inglis, David R.: Publications, drafts and correspondence
1960-1971
Box 2
Inglis, David R., The Atom and Malthus
1970
Box 2:21

Draft and correspondence.

Inglis, David R., Nuclear Energy
1971
Box 2:22
Inglis, David R., The Role of Communications in Avoiding the Worldwide Diffusion of Nuclear Weapons capabilities (preliminary draft)
1960
Box 2:23
Inglis, David R., Test-ban Agreement or Resumption of Tests?
1960
Box 2:24
Janushkovskaya, Dr.
1971
Box 2:25
Jauch, Joseph M.
1954
Box 2:26
Jordan, Walter H.
1970-1971
Box 2:27
Kahn, Herman
1959
Box 2:28
Kerman, Arthur
1962
Box 2:29
Kern, Paul J.
1948
Box 2:30

Invitation to join the Consumers Union Board, which is likely to be targeted by the Thomas Committee.

Kistiakowsky, George B.
1959
Box 2:31
Knox, Carol B.
1970
Box 2:32
Lane, Anthony M.
1955
Box 2:33
Langford, Cooper H.
1963
Box 2:34
Lapp, Ralph
1958-1960
Box 2:35
Laucks, Irving F.
1959
Box 2:36

Includes a copy of Laucks’ pamphlet, Preparedness for Peace: Proposal for a First Step.

Lawson, Bob
1957
Box 2:37
Lee, Kiuck
1957-1963
Box 2:38
Lee, Linwood L.
1954
Box 2:39
Levinger, Joseph S.
1960
Box 2:40
Lipkin, Harry
1962
Box 2:41
Litherland, A. E.
1957
Box 2:42
Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory
1945-1947
Box 2:43

Includes memo from J. Robert Oppenheimer of future of Los Alamos (1945).

Magnuson, Warren G.
1959
Box 2:44
Malin, Murray E.
1961
Box 2:45
Manley, John
1946-1956
Box 2:46
Maryland Independent Citizens’ Committee of the Arts, Sciences, and Professions
1946
Box 2:47
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
1961
Box 2:48

Seeking job openings.

Mayer, Maria
ca.1972
Box 2:49

Notes on recollections of Mayer.

McGovern, George
1970
Box 2:50
McMahon, Brien
1949
Box 2:51
McVay, Kirk
1962
Box 2:52
Meikeljohn, Donald
1954
Box 2:53
Midwest Nuclear Theorists
1963-1970
Box 2:54

Correspondence and organizational materials for Nuclear Theorists’ Group; records of meetings; correspondence with George Volkoff.

Milich, Paul W.
1948
Box 2:55
Miller, John
1959
Box 2:56
Mooney, Melvin
1960
Box 2:57
Mottelson, Ben R.
1961
Box 2:58
Mukherjee, Shankar N.
1969
Box 2:59
National Broadcasting Company
1960
Box 2:60
National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy
1959-1960
Box 2:61
National Planning Association. Committee on Security Through Arms Control
1958-1960
Box 2:62
National Science Foundation. Testimony on a proposed National Science Foundation delivered by Professor H. C. Wolfe…
1948
Box 2:63
New Republic
1959=1960
Box 2:64

Letters to the editor.

Newspaper clippings
Undated
Box 2:65

Mostly on arms negotiation.

New York Times
1957-1960
Box 2:66

Letters to the editor.

Northern Illinois University
1973-1974
Box 2:67
Notes and fragments
Undated
Box 2:68
Ohnuma, S.
1959
Box 2:69
Pal, Manoj Kumar
1957
Box 2:70
Perrin, Francois
1959
Box 2:71
Peterson, Gerald
2003
Box 2:72
Physics Teacher
1968
Box 2:73
Polvani, G.
1955
Box 2:74
Porter, C. E.
1955
Box 2:75
Redish, Edward F.
1968
Box 3:1
Richards, Hugh T.
1952
Box 3:2
Ridenour, Louis N.
1954
Box 3:3
Roberts, Walter
1956
Box 3:4
Roman, Paul
1964
Box 3:5
Rosenzweig, Norbert
1959
Box 3:6
Roser, Francis X.
1949
Box 3:7
Rotary Club of Philmont (N.Y.)
1973
Box 3:8
Russek, Arnold
1957-1958
Box 3:9
Rustgi, Moti
1957
Box 3:10
Seitz, Frederick
1952
Box 3:11
Smith, J. H.
1968
Box 3:12
Smith, Ralph Carlisle
1947
Box 3:13
Spiro, Herbert
1963
Box 3:14
Sperry-Rand Research Center
1961
Box 3:15
Stassen, Harold E.
1957
Box 3:16
Stevenson, Adlai
1960
Box 3:17
Stone, I. F.
1960
Box 3:18
Strauss, Louis E.
1959
Box 3:19

Includes letter of reprimand to Inglis for Strauss’ nomination before the Senate Commerce Committee.

Stubbins, Warren F
1955
Box 3:20
Teillac, Jean
1962
Box 3:21
Temmer, George M.
1966
Box 3:22
Thaler, R. M.
1961
Box 3:23
Thomas, Norman
1959
Box 3:24

Post-War World Council and National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy are organizing public hearings on the meaning of war in a nuclear age.

Thompson, Frank
1959
Box 3:25
Trinklein, Frederick E.
1969
Box 3:26
Tsipis, Kosta
1971
Box 3:27
Tucker, Charles R.
1970
Box 3:28
Turner, L. A.
1956
Box 3:29
Underground nuclear reactors
1960-1974
Box 3:30

Correspondence and notes relating to siting nuclear reactors underground. Includes 2p. TLS from Edward Teller.

University of California
1946
Box 3:31
University of Texas
1952
Box 3:32
Uretsky, Jack
1961
Box 3:33
Vallarata, Manuel S.
1954
Box 3:34
Van Allen, J. A.
1951
Box 3:35
Visscher, William M.
1956
Box 3:36
Vogt, E. W.
1963
Box 3:37
Volkoff, George M.
1963-1964
Box 3:38
Waldman, Bernard
1954
Box 3:39
Wattenberg, Albert
1955
Box 3:40
Way, Kay
1954-1955
Box 3:41
Weinberg, Alvin
1970
Box 3:42
Wigner, Eugene
1959-1970
Box 3:43
Wilson, Robert R.
1948
Box 3:44
Workshop on World Disarmament
1952-1953
Box 3:45
World Association of World Federalists
1957
Box 3:46
World Federation of Scientific Workers
1948-1971
Box 3:47
Wu, T. Y.
1955
Box 3:48
Yarmolinski, Adam
1960
Box 3:49
York, Herbert
1960
Box 3:50
Series 2. Subject files
1929-1976
0.5 linear ft.
Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell. Programme for Nuclear Physics Conference
1950
Box 4:1
Class notes
1935
Box 4:2

Principle of microscopic reversibility for hard elastic spheres; Lorentz transformations; Theory of atomic spectra

Disarmament: ephemera and published works
ca.1960-1973
Box 4:3

Including material from World Law Fund, War/Peace (journal)

Encyclopedia Britannica: Correspondence
1970-1974
Box 4:4

Regarding Inglis’ article “Nucleus, Atomic.”

Encyclopedia Britannica: Drafts
ca.1971
Box 4:5

Short and long versions of “Nucleus, Atomic.”

Encyclopedia Britannica: Notes
ca.1971
Box 4:6
Eppler, E. P.
1974
Box 4:7
French, Bruce
1960
2 TLsS
Box 4:8
Global Survival Program: Correspondence and notes
1972
Box 4:9

Correspondence and memos relating to Fall faculty colloquium, 1972, and Global Survival Program.

Global Survival Program: Publications
1972
4 items
Box 4:10

Includes: Carl A. Carlozzi, “Resources and People;” Leon Clark, “Population education;” Leon Clark, “World population;” David R. Inglis, “Alternatives to the Arms Race with its Risk of Nuclear War;” David R. Inglis, “Nuclear Weapons Control on the Way to Disarmament;” Betty G. Lall, “A Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty.”

Hill, David L., Proposed dynamical analysis of nuclear fission
1948 Mar. 6
Preprint
Box 4:11
Institute for Man and His Environment. Notes
1971-1974
ca.35 items
Box 4:12

Notes, background material, correspondence relating to IMHE.

Institute for Man and His Environment. Publications
1974
6 items
Box 4:13

Printed background materials for use by members of the Review Committee.

Institute for Man and His Environment. Review Committee Report
1974
2 items
Box 4:14
International Conference Nuclear Physics and the Physics of Fundamental Particles — Proceedings
1951
Box 5:1

Published proceedings, with preprint of Enrico Fermi, “High Energy Nuclear Events.”

Marquez, Luis
1962
TLS, enclosure
Box 5:2
New Republic
1960 April 13-Nov. 23
3 items
Box 5:3

Article submitted for publication (“Test ban hopes and handicaps”) and request from editor Gil Harrison for comments on “The meaning of moving forward.”

Nuclear Energy: Its Physics and Social Challenges. Agreements and manuscript reviews
1970-1971
Box 5:4
Nuclear Energy: Its Physics and Social Challenges. Correspondence
1970-1971
Box 5:5
Nuclear Energy: Its Physics and Social Challenges. Correspondence
1972-1976
Box 5:6
Nuclear Energy: Its Physics and Social Challenges. Manuscript
ca.1971
4 folders
Box 5:7-10
Nuclear Energy: Its Physics and Social Challenges. Reviews
1973
Box 5:11
Nuclear Reactor Safety (Wash 1400)
1971-1974
Box 6:1

Published articles on nuclear reactor safety. See also Papers: “Database and the conclusion of WASH 1400″

Oppenheimer, J. Robert
1954
3 items
Box 6:2
Atomic Energy Commission, “Statement by the Atomic Energy Commission” [regarding decision to deny Oppenheimer clearance to restricted material]
1954 June 29
Smyth, Henry D., “Statement by the Atomic Energy Commission” [regarding decision to restore Oppenheimer's security clearance]
1954 June 29
2 copies
Oral History transcripts (original), parts 1-6
1989 Feb. 16
Box 6:3

Interviewers: Roy Cook, Ted Harrison, Francis Pichanick, Monroe Rabin, Janice Shafer, Morton Sternheim.

Oral History transcripts (revised), parts 1-3
1989 Feb. 16
Box 6:4

Edited by W.J. Mullin.

O’Sullivan, T. C. letter to David R Inglis
1965 May 5
5 items
Box 6:5
Abt, Clark C., Arms control and disarmament: Implications of future weapon technology
Undated
Abt, Clark C., Disarmament as a strategy
1962 Dec.
O’Sullivan, T. C., Advantages and disadvantages of progressive zonal inspection of disarmament
ca.1964
O’Sullivan, T. C., But what if nobody cheats?
ca.1965
Papers: Database and the Conclusion of Wash 1400
1974
Box 6:6

Includes two drafts of the paper, notes, and some correspondence. See also Nuclear Reactor Safety publications/

Papers: Degrees of Disarmament
ca.1960
2 TDfs
Box 6:7
Papers: Disarmament Attitudes
ca.1960
TDf
Box 6:8
Papers: Evanston
1960 Jan. 29
Notes
Box 6:9

Outline (for article?) on recent disarmament talks.

Papers: Geneva in Perspective
ca.1960
TDf, notes
Box 6:10

Brief paper on disarmament talks in Geneva.

Papers: Mossbauer Effect volume
1961
Box 6:11

Correspondence, rough draft, and final draft relating to Inglis’ contribution to Hans Frauenfelder’s book, The Mossbauer Effect. Includes Inglis’ article, “Resonance radiation of nuclei bound in a lattice,” and Harry J. Lipkin, “Some sunoke features of the Mossbauer Effect.”

Papers: A Somewhat (More Over) Simplified Version of Greider’s Analysis of the j-Dependent Double Period in Stripping Angular Distributions
1964
Box 6:12

Includes drafts, notes, and correspondence of article written with Murray Peshkin.

Personal and biographical
1963-1997
Box 7:1

Includes obituaries, curriculum vita, news clippings, and photograph.

Polarization of Proton Beams
1956-1962
Box 7:2

Includes correspondence with Richard L. Garwin, et al., photograph.

Research notes: Alpha and (jj) Shell Model
1953
Box 7:3
Research notes: Argonne National Laboratory
1951-1952
Box 7:4
Research notes: Argonne National Laboratory
1955-1957
Box 7:5
Research notes: Argonne National Laboratory
1959-1961
Box 7:6
Research notes: Argonne National Laboratory
1961 Oct.-1962 Dec.
Box 7:7
Research notes: Argonne National Laboratory
1964 Sept.-1965 Nov.
Box 7:8
Research notes: Argonne National Laboratory
1965 Dec.- ?
Box 7:9
Research notes: Argonne National Laboratory
1967-1968
Box 7:10
Research notes: Butler, Stripping Reactions
Undated
Box 7:11
Research notes: CERN
1957-1959
Box 7:12
Research notes: Threshold States
ca.1961
Box 7:13
SIPRI: International Institute for Peace and Conflict Research, Stockholm
1968 Aug.
Box 8
Davies, David, Seismic Methods for Monitoring Underground Explosions: An Assessment of the Status and Outlook
1968 Aug.
Box 8:1
SIPRI Symposium: Review of Nuclear Proliferation Problems
1973
2 folders
Box 8:2

Correspondence, Agenda, and papers for symposium held in Tallberg, Seden, June 15-18, 1973.

Background Paper 1. Inglis, David R., Civil Uses of Nuclear Explosives
1973
Box 8:2

Revised version of paper presented at Pugwash Symposium, 1968.

Background Paper 2. Jasani, B. M., Fast Breeder Reactors
1973
Box 8:2
Paper P3. Goldschmidt, B., International Nuclear Collaboration and Article IV of the Non-Proliferation Treaty
1973
Box 8:2
Paper P4. Imai, R., Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty: Japanese Attitude Three Years After Signature
1973
Box 8:2
Paper P5. Hopkins, J. C., Nuclear Weapons Technology
1973
Box 8:2
Paper P6. Flapan, S., Israel’s Attitudes To NPT
1973
Box 8:2
Paper P7. Subrahmanyam, K., The Indian Attitudes To NPT
1973
Box 8:3
Paper P8. Jasani, B. M., Uranium Enrichment
1973
Box 8:3
Paper P9. Willrich, M., Non-Governmental Nuclear Weapon Proliferation
1973
Box 8:3
Paper P10. Reiner, R. and B. Sanders, The IAEA’s NPT Safeguards: National Control and International Safeguards
1973
Box 8:3
Paper P11. Calogero, F., Italy and the Nuclear Option
1973
Box 8:3
Stacks: A Publication of the Libraries of the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn
1968
1 item
Box 8:4
Talks on nuclear rotation
1958-1959
Box 8:5

Notes and outlines.

Talks: The space age and world welfare. Detroit, Michigan
1958 October 22
Box 8:5a
University of Michigan Symposium on Theoretical Physics Programs
1929-1932
4 items
Box 8:6
Wallace, DeWitt
1960 Sept. 10
Re: balance in coverage of disarmament in Readers Digest.
Box 8:7
Wilson, A. R. W., Current Status of Civil Engineering and Mineral Resource Development Application of Peaceful Nuclear Explosions
1971
Box 8:8

Paper presented at 4th International Conference on Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, Geneva, 6-16 Sept. 1971.

Series 3. Course Notes
1945-1965
0.5 linear ft.
Gindler, J. E. and J. R. Huizenga, Nuclear Fission
ca.1965
3 folders
Box 9:1-3
Hagedorn, R., Introduction to Field Theory and Dispersion Relations
1961
174pp.
Box 9:4
Schiff, E. I. and E. M. Baroody, Statistical Mechanics. Los Alamos University
1945
46pp., 6 sections
Box 9:5

Notes by P.R. Stein and I. Halpern

Teller, Edward and E. J. Konopinksi, Introduction to Quantum Mechanics: A Course at Los Alamos University
1946
136pp.
Box 9:6

Notes by Marvin E. Wyman and S. Goldberg

Weisskopf, Victor F., Introduction to Field Theory
1953-1954
15 lectures
Box 9:7
Weisskopf, Victor F., Relativistic Quantum Mechanics (lectures given at MIT in 1953/1954)
ca.1957
149pp.
Box 9:8
Wigner, Eugene P., Wigner’s Notes on Nuclear Structure and Beta Theory. University of Wisconsin
1951 Fall
84pp.
Box 9:9
Series 4. Publications by Inglis (Reprints)
1929-1980
0.5 linear ft.
Publications: A
1939-1972
13 items
Box 10:1
Publications: B-C
1939-1969
9 items
Box 10:2
Publications: D
1935-1965
7 items
Box 10:3
Publications: E
1931-1955
8 items
Box 10:4
Publications: F
1958-1959
3 items
Box 10:5
Publications: G-I
1931-1967
9 items
Box 10:6
Publications: J-Na
1933-1956
5 items
Box 10:7
Publications: “‘No-cities attacks’ or disarmament?”
1963
1 item
Box 10:8
Publications: Non-Nu
1929-1974
14 items
Box 10:9
Publications: O
1934-1973
15 items
Box 10:10
Publications: P-R
1930-1972
15 items
Box 10:11
Publications: S
1929-1980
16 items
Box 10:12
Publications: T
1948-1975
8 items
Box 10:13
Publications: U-Z
1931-1979
6 items
Box 10:14
Series 5. Audiovisual
1989
1.0 linear ft.

For transcripts, see Ser. 1: Oral History. Interviewers: Roy Cook, Ted Harrison, Francis Pichanick, Monroe Rabin, Janice Shafer, Morton Sternheim.

Oral History: Conversations with David R. Inglis, Part 1: Physics and Physicists in the 1920s and 1930s
1989
VHS master
Box 11:1
Oral History: Conversations with David R. Inglis, Part 2: The War Years
1989
VHS master
Box 11:2
Oral History: Conversations with David R. Inglis, Part 3: The Frontiers of Physics
1989
VHS master
Box 11:3
Oral History: Conversations with David R. Inglis, Part 4: The Post-War Years
1989
VHS master
Box 12:1
Oral History: Conversations with David R. Inglis, Part 5: The Problem of Arms Control and Disarmament
1989
VHS master
Box 12:2
Oral History: Conversations with David R. Inglis, Part 6: The 1970s and 1980s
1989
VHS master
Box 12:3
Inglis, David R., Lecture to Allan Hoffman’s class on the Manhattan Project and the atomic bombing of Japan
1972 May 1
DVD
Box 12:4
Scope and content:

Allan R. Hoffman, a young physics professor at UMass Amherst, invited Inglis to lecture to his undergraduate, non-major course on energy and arms control.

Provenance:

Gift of Allan R. Hoffman, 2007.

Subjects
  • Allegiance--United States
  • Argonne National Laboratories
  • Condon, Edward Uhler, 1902-1974
  • Federation of American Scientists
  • Los Alamos National Laboratory
  • Nuclear disarmament
  • Nuclear energy
  • Nuclear warfare
  • Oppenheimer, J. Robert, 1904-1967
  • Physics--Massachusetts
  • United States--History--1945-1953
  • United States--History--1953-1961
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physics
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Institute for Man and His Environment
  • World Association of World Federalists
  • World Federation of Scientific Workers
Contributors
  • Bohr, Aage
  • Inglis, David Rittenhouse, 1905-
  • Teller, Edward, 1908-2003
  • Wigner, Eugene Paul, 1902-1995
Types of material
  • Laboratory notes
  • Oral histories
  • Photographs
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