Special Collections & University Archives University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries

Results for: “Cornish, Michael” (82 collections)
SCUA

2001 Center/Renaissance Community (part 4)

The Lodge, 1982. (Ref. no. bin283)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
McCue house. August, 1983. (Ref. no. bin284)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Peter and Eileen Caddy, founders of Findhorn Community, with Michael Rapunzel. The Lodge, June, 1976. (Ref. no. bin285)
The Barn, 1981. (Ref. no. bin286)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Doug Edson, 1979. (Ref. no. bin287)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Barn construction with Steve Miller, 1980. (Ref. no. bin288)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Marilyn Dowling working on Michael’s house, 1979. (Ref. no. bin289)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Woodpile. The Lodge was heated by a wood furnace. May, 1979. (Ref. no. bin290)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Meeting on the ridge above Lodge. August, 1982. (Ref. no. bin291)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Pumpkin field below Michael’s house. September, 1981. (Ref. no. bin292)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Rocket’s Silver Train bus with Justin Jaquay, 1979. (Ref. no. bin293)
McCue house under construction, 1977. (Ref. no. bin294)
Peter Caddy with Michael Rapunzel before lecture in Theater. Turners Falls, 1979. (Ref. no. bin295)
Margie McClure, Ivan Senior, Betsy Sullivan, Karen Barry, 1981. (Ref. no. bin296)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Mobile Feast food concession at Supersession concert. Renee Fenner, Steve Wolfson. July, 1977 (Ref. no. bin297)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Evening at the swimming hole, 1982. (Ref. no. bin298)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Cornfield in bloom, August 1981. (Ref. no. bin299)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Saturday Work Day project at the Lodge, August, 1982. (Ref. no. bin300)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Cheryl Termo with kids. June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin301)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Office in Barn with Sandra Jaquay-Wilson. (Ref. no. bin302)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Tilling the land with Bill Stone on tractor. April, 1983. (Ref. no. bin303)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Class of 1981. (Ref. no. bin304)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Garden scene, 1983. (Ref. no. bin305)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Sunday morning at the Lodge. Debby Stone, Bill and Monica Grabin, 1979. (Ref. no. bin306)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Barn under construction, 1979. (Ref. no. bin307)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Greeting Cards booth at trade show with Melvin Weiner. New York City, 1979. (Ref. no. bin308)
Photo by: Daniel Brown

2001 Center/Renaissance Community (part 5)

Silver Screen Design office with Ruth Miller and Margie McClure. Turners Falls, 1979. (Ref. no. bin309)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Joanne Santos with goats, June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin310)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
May Ristich, Robin Paris, Gale Jensen, 1983. (Ref. no. bin311)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Emily Babbitt and May Ristich. June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin312)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Findhorn founder, Dorothy McLean lecturing in Theater with Bill Grabin. Turners Falls, 1978. (Ref. no. bin313)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Cheryl Termo, business manager of Silver Screen Design. Turners Falls, 1983. (Ref. no. bin314)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Digging out the swimming hole. Lois Sellers and Michael Rapunzel, 1981. (Ref. no. bin315)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Kids at the Lodge; Lamia Holland, Zach Vaughn, Elka Holland. September, 1982. (Ref. no. bin316)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Painters working in Roxbury, Mass. housing project. Spencer Liebmann and Renee Fenner. December, 1977. (Ref. no. bin317)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Debby Edson with newborn Daniel and unidentified, 1982. (Ref. no. bin318)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Lois Sellers working on the Barn, 1981. (Ref. no. bin319)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Steve Greenwald working on his house, 1979. (Ref. no. bin320)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Concert at Unity Park. Turners Falls, 1978. (Ref. no. bin321)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Laura Berg, Chris Garland, Melvin Weiner. Supersession concert, New Hampshire. July, 1977. (Ref. no. bin322)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
(Ref. no. bin323)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Irene and Eleanor Berwick in the garden. July, 1982. (Ref. no. bin324)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Nursery kids at the Lodge. August, 1980. (Ref. no. bin325)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Theater after meditation. Linda Ladd, John Charmella, Cheryl Termo with Che. Turners Falls, December, 1977. (Ref. no. bin326)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Noble Feast salad crew. Unidentified, Jane Harris, Rena Saperstein. Turners Falls, May 1979. (Ref. no. bin327)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Mobile Feast food concession. June 1979. (Ref. no. bin328)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Kids at festival on land, August, 1977. (Ref. no. bin329)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Annie Charest and Randy Tuttle, 1981. (Ref. no. bin330)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Logging crew, 1980. (Ref. no. bin331)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Wedding of Debby and Doug Edson. July, 1981. (Ref. no. bin332)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Robin Paris and May Ristich. August, 1979. (Ref. no. bin333)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Marvin and Kathy Murphy-Moss with Luke, 1979. (Ref. no. bin334)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Misty Barn. June, 1979. (Ref. no. bin335)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Saturday Work Day project cutting wood . June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin336)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Marilyn Dowling preparing greenhouse at McCue house. March, 1983. (Ref. no. bin337)
Photo by: Daniel Brown

Albertson, Dean

Dean Albertson Collection of Oral History Transcripts and Student Papers, 1975-1977.
1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 224

Dean Albertson’s 384-level History classes at the University of Massachusetts Amherst conducted interviews with social activists of the 1960s and early 1970s, participants and observers in the Springfield, Massachusetts North End riots of 1975, and war and nuclear power resisters. The collection includes transcripts of 15 interviews conducted during the years 1975-1977, as well as the students’ papers, which put the transcripts into context. See also the Dean Albertson Papers (FS 109).

Subjects
  • Antinuclear movement--Massachusetts
  • Attica Correctional Facility
  • Civil rights--Massachusetts--Hampden County
  • Demonstrations--Massachusetts--Chicopee
  • Hampden County (Mass.) Civil Liberties Union
  • History--Study and teaching (Higher)--Massachusetts--Amherst
  • Police shootings--Massachusetts--Springfield
  • Political activists--Massachusetts
  • Prison riots--New York (State)--Attica
  • Puerto Ricans--Massachusetts--Springfield
  • Riots--Massachusetts--Springfield
  • Selma-Montgomery Rights March, 1965
  • Springfield (Mass.)--History
  • Springfield (Mass.)--Race relations
  • Springfield (Mass.)--Social conditions
  • Springfield Area Movement for a Democratic Society
  • Venceremos Brigade
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest movements--Massachusetts--Springfield
  • Weatherman (Organization)
  • Welfare rights movement--Massachusetts--Springfield
  • Westover Air Force Base (Mass.)
Contributors
  • Albertson, Dean, 1920-
  • Lecodet, Rafael
Types of material
  • Oral histories

Association for Gravestone Studies

Association for Gravestone Studies Collection

Association for Gravestone Studies Book Collection, 1812-2005.
269 items (14 linear feet).
Call no.: Rare Book Collections

Founded in 1977, the Association for Gravestone Studies (AGS) is an international organization dedicated to furthering the study and preservation of gravestones. Based in Greenfield, Mass., the Association promotes the study of gravestones from historical and artistic perspectives. To raise public awareness about the significance of historic gravemarkers and the issues surrounding their preservation, the AGS sponsors conferences and workshops, publishes both a quarterly newsletter and annual journal, Markers, and has built an archive of collections documenting gravestones and the memorial industry.

The AGS Books Collection contains scarce, out of print, and rare printed works on cemeteries and graveyards, epitaphs and inscriptions, and gravemarkers, with an emphasis on North America. The collection is divided into two series: Series 1 (Monographs and Offprints) and Series 2 (Theses and Dissertations).

Subjects
  • Cemeteries
  • Epitaphs
  • Sepulchral monuments
Contributors
  • Association for Gravestone Studies

Bajgier Family

Bajgier Family Papers, 1925-1986.
2 boxes (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 400

Joseph and Martha Bajgier at Bell Market, Chicopee, 1937
Joseph and Martha Bajgier at Bell Market, Chicopee, 1937

On March 13, 1903, Joseph Michael Bajgier was born in Odrzykon, Poland, the youngest of three sons in a farming family. Schooled only through the third grade, Joseph served as a young man in the First Air Division of the Polish Army before following his older brother in emigrating to the United States in 1927. Settling in Chicopee, Mass., with its large and active Polish community, Bajgier began work as a slaughterer of pigs for a meat processing company, but within a few years, he had saved enough money to purchase a small grocery store in Longmeadow. In about 1935, he returned to Chicopee, purchasing a grocery and deli, Bell Market, that his family ran for 36 years. Bajgier was deeply involved in the local Polish community as a member of the Polish National Alliance, the Holy Name Society of St. Stanislaus Parish, and an organization of Polish veterans in exile (Stowarzyszenie Polskich Kombatantow). He and his wife Martha (Misiaszek) had two sons, Casimir and Edward

The Bajgier collection documents the lives of a Polish family in Chicopee, Mass., from the time of immigration through the 1970s. The core of the collection surrounds the life of Joseph Bajgier, and includes a number of documents and a diary from the time of his emigration in 1927, a fascinating series of letters from relatives in Turaszowka, Poland before and after the Second World War, and several photographs of the family and their business in Chicopee.

Subjects
  • Chicopee (Mass.)--Social life and customs
  • Polish Americans--Massachusetts
  • World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
  • Bajgier, Joseph M
Types of material
  • Photographs

Bartels, Elmer C.

Elmer C. Bartels Papers, 1965-2010.
8 boxes (12 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 817

As the Commissioner of the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission for thirty years, Elmer C. Bartels became a national leader on issues related to vocational rehabilitation and independent living for people with disabilities. While studying physics at Colby College in 1960, Bartels broke his neck in an inter-fraternity hockey game, but returned to complete his degree and then to earn an MS at Tufts. While working as a computer programmer at the Laboratory for Nuclear Science at MIT and later at Honeywell, he became involved in coordinating services and access that members of the community needed to survive. To address the range of issues relating to employment, housing, and architectural barriers for people with disabilities, he helped found three significant organizations: the Massachusetts Association of Paraplegiacs (1964), the Massachusetts Council of Organizations of the Handicapped (a cross-disability organization created in the late 1960s with Harold Remmes) and the Boston Center for Independent Living (1972). Bartels was a key figure in securing passage of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, considered the first civil-rights statute for persons with disabilities. In 1977, Bartels was appointed to the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission by Gov. Michael Dukakis, serving under seven successive administrations, leaving an important mark on public policy. Since leaving the MRC, Bartels has remained active as a teacher and advocate for disability issues.

The Bartels Papers are an important resource for study of the early history of disability advocacy and public policy in Massachusetts. The collection includes a wealth of material on the formation and activity of the Massachusetts Association of Paraplegiacs, the National Paraplegia Foundation, and the Mass Rehabilitation Commission; correspondence with other leading figures in the disability rights movement; and publications relating to legislation on disability issues, vocational rehabilitation, and independent living.

Subjects
  • People with disabilities--Civil rights
  • People with disabilities--Legal status, laws, etc.
Contributors
  • Massaachusetts. Rehabilitation Commission
  • Massachusetts Association of Paraplegiacs

Barton, Thomas

Thomas Barton Papers, 1947-1977 (Bulk: 1960-1974).
4 boxes (2 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 539

YPSL logo
YPSL logo

In the early 1960s, Tom Barton (b. 1935) emerged as a leader in the Left-wing of the Young People’s Socialist League, the national youth affiliate of the Socialist Party. Deeply committed to the civil rights and antiwar struggles and to revolutionary organizing, Barton operated in Philadelphia, Chicago, and New York and was a delegate and National Secretary at the 1964 convention in which tensions within YPSL led to its dissolution.

A small, but rich collection, the Barton Papers provide a glimpse into the career of a long-time Socialist and activist. From Barton’s entry into the Young People’s Socialist League in the latest 1950s through his work with the Wildcat group in the early 1970s, the collection contains outstanding content on the civil rights and antiwar movements and the strategies for radical organizing. The collection is particularly rich on two periods of Barton’s career — his time in the YPSL and Student Peace Union (1960-1964) and in the Wildcat group (1968-1971) — and particularly for the events surrounding the dissolution of YPSL in 1964, following a heated debate over whether to support Lyndon Johnson for president. The collection includes correspondence with other young radicals such as Martin Oppenheimer, Lyndon Henry, Juan McIver, and Joe Weiner.

Subjects
  • Antiwar movements
  • Civil rights movements
  • Communists
  • Revolutionaries
  • Socialist Party of the United States of America
  • Socialists--United States
  • Student Peace Union
  • Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest movements
  • Wildcat
  • Young People's Socialist League
Contributors
  • Barton, Thomas
  • Gilbert, Carl
  • Henry, Lyndon
  • MacFadyen, Gavin
  • McIver, Juan
  • Oppenheimer, Martin
  • Shatkin, Joan
  • Shatkin, Norm
  • Verret, Joe
  • Weiner, Joe

Bleyman, Lea K.

Lea K. Bleyman Papers, 1958-2004.
2 boxes (3 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 548

The protistologist Lea Bleyman has conducted research into the genetics, mating systems, and life cycles of ciliates. A former student of Tracy Sonneborn, Bleyman has served as past Secretary and President (2001-2002) of the Society of Protozoologists, and spent many years on the faculty of the Department of Natural Sciences at Baruch College.

The Bleyman Papers contain lab and research notes, abstracts of talks and conference materials, along with some correspondence and annual progress reports from Baruch College. The earliest materials in the collection relate to her years as a student in Sonneborn’s lab.

Subjects
  • Baruch College--Faculty
  • Paramecium--Genetics
  • Protozoans--Composition
  • Protozoans--Genetics
  • Protozoology--Conference
  • Society of Protozoologists
  • Tetrahymena--Genetics
Contributors
  • Bleyman, Lea K
  • Nanney, David Ledbetter, 1925-
  • Sonneborn, Tracy Morton, 1905-1981
Types of material
  • Laboratory notes

Broadside Press

Broadside Press Collection, 1965-1984.
1 box, 110 vols. (3.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 571

Broadside 6
Broadside 6

A significant African American poet of the generation of the 1960s, Dudley Randall was an even more significant publisher of emerging African American poets and writers. Publishing works by important writers from Gwendolyn Brooks to Haki Madhubuti, Alice Walker, Etheridge Knight, Audre Lorde, Amiri Baraka, Nikki Giovanni, and Sonia Sanchez, his Broadside Press in Detroit became an important contributor to the Black Arts Movement.

The Broadside Press Collection includes approximately 200 titles published by Randall’s press during its first decade of operation, the period of its most profound cultural influence. The printed works are divided into five series, Broadside poets (including chapbooks, books of poetry, and posters), anthologies, children’s books, the Broadside Critics Series (works of literary criticism by African American authors), and the Broadsides Series. . The collection also includes a selection of items used in promoting Broadside Press publications, including a broken run of the irregularly published Broadside News, press releases, catalogs, and fliers and advertising cards.

Subjects
  • African American poets
  • African American writers
  • Black Arts Movement
  • Poetry
Contributors
  • Broadside Press
  • Brooks, Gwendolyn, 1917-2000
  • Emanuel, James A
  • Giovanni, Nikki
  • Knight, Etheridge
  • Madhubuti, Haki R., 1942-
  • Randall, Dudley, 1914-
  • Sanchez, Sonia, 1934-
Types of material
  • Broadsides
  • Ephemera
  • Posters

Brotherhood of the Spirit

Brotherhood of the Spirit Documentary, ca.1973.
15.24 minutes
Call no.: Video

Beginning in a treehouse in Leyden, Mass., during the summer of 1968, the Brotherhood of the Spirit (later the Renaissance Community) grew to become the largest commune in the eastern United States. Founded by Michael Metelica and six friends, and infused with the spiritual teachings of Elwood Babbitt, the commune relocated several times during its first half decade, setting down at different points in Heath, Charlemont, Warwick, Turners Falls, and Gill, Mass., as well as Guilford, Vt.

Produced at UMass Amherst, this video (digitized from a 16mm motion picture original) provides a largely laudatory glimpse of commune life during the boom years of the Brotherhood of the Spirit, probably around 1973. Sound quality in the video is highly uneven, often poor, particularly in the first two minutes.

Subjects
  • Brotherhood of the Spirit
  • Communal living--Massachusetts
  • Metelica, Michael
Types of material
  • Motion pictures (Visual works)
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