Special Collections & University Archives University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries

Results for: “Land surveys” (145 collections)
SCUA

Northampton Cutlery Company

Northampton Cutlery Company Records, 1869-1987.
113 boxes (55.75 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 058

The Northampton Cutlery Company was among the major firms in a region known for high quality cutlery manufacture. Incorporated in 1871 with Judge Samuel L. Hinckley, its largest stockholder, as its first President, the company was located along the Mill River in Northampton, Massachusetts, where operations continued until its closing in 1987.

Records document company operations and technology used in the cutlery manufacturing process, as well as details about employment of immigrant and working class families in the region. Includes administrative, legal, and financial records; correspondence; personnel and labor relations files; and production schedules and specifications.

Subjects
  • Cutlery trade--Massachusetts
  • Northampton (Mass.)--History
Contributors
  • Northampton Cutlery Company

Passin, Herbert

Herbert Passin Collection, 1944-1955.
1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 565

A distinguished scholar of contemporary Japan, Herbert Passin was born in Chicago on Dec. 16, 1916. After completing a doctorate in anthropology in 1941, Passin was inducted into the Army and sent to the Army’s Japanese language school in Ann Arbor, Michigan, for training. Assigned to duty in Tokyo in December 1945, he became chief of the Public Opinion and Sociological Research Division under Gen. Douglas MacArthur. During his tour of duty, Passin coordinated a series of sociological studies of Japanese village life to help guide U.S. Occupation policy, particularly as it dealt with land and labor reform.

The Passin Collection contains reports and notes of sociological surveys of two Japanese villages, Yuzurihara and Yawatano, conducted by U.S. Occupation authorities in 1946 and 1947, along with a wartime report by Arthur Meadow of “Japanese character structure based on Japanese film plots and thematic apperception tests on Japanese Americans,” and a post-war letter from the novelist Takami Jun.

Subjects
  • Japan--History--Allied occupation, 1945-1952
  • Japan--Sociology--Occupation
Contributors
  • Passin, Herbert
Types of material
  • Letters (Correspondence)

Solander, Arvo A.

Arvo A. Solander Papers, 1930-1958.
8 boxes (4 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 587

Graduating from Harvard in the thick of the Great Depression, Arvo A. Solander worked as a civil and sanitary engineer for a variety of state and federal agencies, including the Civil Works Administration and the Civilian Conservation Corps. During the 1930s, as opportunity arose, he filled positions as a road engineer, in the design and construction of water and sewage plants, in pollution control, as a safety engineer in the shellfish industry, and in mosquito control, taking jobs throughout Massachusetts and as far away as Tennessee. After using his talents as an officer in the Sanitary Corps during the Second World War, based primarily in Arkansas, Solander returned home to Massachusetts and opened a private engineering office in South Hadley. He worked as a civil engineer and surveyor until his death in January 1976.

The Arvo Solander Papers consists of twenty-four bound volumes documenting thirty years of varied work as an engineer, including his contributions to the construction of the Quabbin Reservoir. Within the bound volumes are a wide range of reports, typescripts, sketches and diagrams, graphs, contracts and design specifications, photographs, and postcards.

Subjects
  • Civil engineers
  • Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.)
  • Depressions--1929
  • Fisheries--Massachusetts
  • Mosquitoes--Control
  • Quabbin Reservoir (Mass.)
  • Roads--Design and construction
  • Sanitary engineers
  • Sewage disposal plants--Design and construction
  • United States. Federal Civil Works Administration
  • Water--Pollution--Tennessee
  • Water-supply--Massachusetts
  • Westfield State Sanatorium
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • Wrentham State School
Contributors
  • Solander, Arvo A
Types of material
  • Photographs
  • Scrapbooks

Southeast Asia

Southeast Asia Collection, 1925-1986.
Call no.: MS 407

The Southeast Asia Collection highlights the regional wars from the 1970s to the 1980s, including a series on Southeast Asian refugees in America, along with materials on regional economic development, especially in the Mekong River Basin. The collection contains hundreds of reports on agricultural and industrial projects in the region, examining everything from the impact of electrification on village life in Thailand to a description of a Soviet-built hospital in Cambodia in 1961, to an assessment of herbicide in Vietnam in 1971.

Collected primarily by Joel Halpern and James Hafner, the collection includes background, field, and situation reports by U.S. Operations Missions and U.S. Agency for International Development; reports, publications, statistics, and background information from other U.S. government agencies, governments of Laos and Thailand, and the United Nations; correspondence, reports, and reference materials of nongovernmental organizations; reports and essays by individuals about Southeast Asia; news releases and newspapers; published and unpublished bibliographies; and interviews with U.S. military personnel. Most material comes from governmental and organizational sources, but there are papers by, and debriefs of, numerous individuals.

Subjects
  • Cambodia--History--1953-1975
  • Laos--History
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975
Contributors
  • Hafner, James
  • Halpern, Joel Martin

2001 Center/Renaissance Community (part 3)

Nursery outing; kids with Larry Raffel, November, 1976 (Ref. no. bin257)
House eventually belonging to the Edson family, 1983. (Ref. no. bin258)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Greenhouse at Brian McCue’s house, June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin259)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Michael Rapunzel on [unknown] TV talk show, 1977. (Ref. no. bin260)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Donna Liebmann performing at local festival on land, 1977. (Ref. no. bin261)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Michael Rapunzel and Steven Greenwald’s house under construction, August, 1979. (Ref. no. bin262)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Noble Feast interior. Turners Falls, 1978. (Ref. no. bin263)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Construction detail of Michael’s house, 1980. (Ref. no. bin264)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Frog Hunters at the swimming hole. Ariel Brown and Zach Vaughn, July, 1983. (Ref. no. bin265)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Jim Sullivan, 1979. (Ref. no. bin266)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Noble Feast exterior. Turners Falls, 1977. (Ref. no. bin267)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Greenhouse interior at Brian McCue’s house. June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin268)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Long view of the Lodge. June, 1981. (Ref. no. bin269)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
View of the Warwick house. House in rear is on the site of the former Dorm. Warwick, 1988. (Ref. no. bin270)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Swimming hole at 2001 Center. August, 1982. (Ref. no. bin271)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Gladiolas in bloom near McCue house. July, 1982. (Ref. no. bin272)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Frog Hunters in action. Ariel Brown, Crymson Sullivan, Krishna Lennon. May, 1982. (Ref. no. bin273)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Andrew Bush and friend. June 1983. (Ref. no. bin274)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Working in the garden between Michael and McCue houses. June, 1982. (Ref. no. bin275)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
McCue’s house. June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin276)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
View of Marilyn Dowling’s garden between Michael and McCue houses. June, 1983 (Ref. no. bin277)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance members celebrating at Getting to the Same Place festival. New Hampshire, May, 1979. (Ref. no. bin278)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
ICRY [Inner-City Roundtable of Youth], New York City street gang organization gathering at Lodge, 1981. (Ref. no. bin279)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Alan Harris in Punk-phase, Marilyn Dowling outside the Barn, 1982. (Ref. no. bin280)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
2001 Center cornfield, 1981. (Ref. no. bin281)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Frolic by the swimming hole. May, 1982. (Ref. no. bin282)
Photo by: Daniel Brown

2001 Center/Renaissance Community (part 4)

The Lodge, 1982. (Ref. no. bin283)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
McCue house. August, 1983. (Ref. no. bin284)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Peter and Eileen Caddy, founders of Findhorn Community, with Michael Rapunzel. The Lodge, June, 1976. (Ref. no. bin285)
The Barn, 1981. (Ref. no. bin286)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Doug Edson, 1979. (Ref. no. bin287)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Barn construction with Steve Miller, 1980. (Ref. no. bin288)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Marilyn Dowling working on Michael’s house, 1979. (Ref. no. bin289)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Woodpile. The Lodge was heated by a wood furnace. May, 1979. (Ref. no. bin290)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Meeting on the ridge above Lodge. August, 1982. (Ref. no. bin291)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Pumpkin field below Michael’s house. September, 1981. (Ref. no. bin292)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Rocket’s Silver Train bus with Justin Jaquay, 1979. (Ref. no. bin293)
McCue house under construction, 1977. (Ref. no. bin294)
Peter Caddy with Michael Rapunzel before lecture in Theater. Turners Falls, 1979. (Ref. no. bin295)
Margie McClure, Ivan Senior, Betsy Sullivan, Karen Barry, 1981. (Ref. no. bin296)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Mobile Feast food concession at Supersession concert. Renee Fenner, Steve Wolfson. July, 1977 (Ref. no. bin297)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Evening at the swimming hole, 1982. (Ref. no. bin298)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Cornfield in bloom, August 1981. (Ref. no. bin299)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Saturday Work Day project at the Lodge, August, 1982. (Ref. no. bin300)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Cheryl Termo with kids. June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin301)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Office in Barn with Sandra Jaquay-Wilson. (Ref. no. bin302)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Tilling the land with Bill Stone on tractor. April, 1983. (Ref. no. bin303)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Class of 1981. (Ref. no. bin304)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Garden scene, 1983. (Ref. no. bin305)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Sunday morning at the Lodge. Debby Stone, Bill and Monica Grabin, 1979. (Ref. no. bin306)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Barn under construction, 1979. (Ref. no. bin307)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Greeting Cards booth at trade show with Melvin Weiner. New York City, 1979. (Ref. no. bin308)
Photo by: Daniel Brown

2001 Center/Renaissance Community (part 5)

Silver Screen Design office with Ruth Miller and Margie McClure. Turners Falls, 1979. (Ref. no. bin309)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Joanne Santos with goats, June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin310)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
May Ristich, Robin Paris, Gale Jensen, 1983. (Ref. no. bin311)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Emily Babbitt and May Ristich. June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin312)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Findhorn founder, Dorothy McLean lecturing in Theater with Bill Grabin. Turners Falls, 1978. (Ref. no. bin313)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Cheryl Termo, business manager of Silver Screen Design. Turners Falls, 1983. (Ref. no. bin314)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Digging out the swimming hole. Lois Sellers and Michael Rapunzel, 1981. (Ref. no. bin315)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Kids at the Lodge; Lamia Holland, Zach Vaughn, Elka Holland. September, 1982. (Ref. no. bin316)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Painters working in Roxbury, Mass. housing project. Spencer Liebmann and Renee Fenner. December, 1977. (Ref. no. bin317)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Debby Edson with newborn Daniel and unidentified, 1982. (Ref. no. bin318)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Lois Sellers working on the Barn, 1981. (Ref. no. bin319)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Steve Greenwald working on his house, 1979. (Ref. no. bin320)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Concert at Unity Park. Turners Falls, 1978. (Ref. no. bin321)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Laura Berg, Chris Garland, Melvin Weiner. Supersession concert, New Hampshire. July, 1977. (Ref. no. bin322)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
(Ref. no. bin323)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Irene and Eleanor Berwick in the garden. July, 1982. (Ref. no. bin324)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Nursery kids at the Lodge. August, 1980. (Ref. no. bin325)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Theater after meditation. Linda Ladd, John Charmella, Cheryl Termo with Che. Turners Falls, December, 1977. (Ref. no. bin326)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Noble Feast salad crew. Unidentified, Jane Harris, Rena Saperstein. Turners Falls, May 1979. (Ref. no. bin327)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Mobile Feast food concession. June 1979. (Ref. no. bin328)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Kids at festival on land, August, 1977. (Ref. no. bin329)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Annie Charest and Randy Tuttle, 1981. (Ref. no. bin330)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Logging crew, 1980. (Ref. no. bin331)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Wedding of Debby and Doug Edson. July, 1981. (Ref. no. bin332)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Robin Paris and May Ristich. August, 1979. (Ref. no. bin333)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Marvin and Kathy Murphy-Moss with Luke, 1979. (Ref. no. bin334)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Misty Barn. June, 1979. (Ref. no. bin335)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Saturday Work Day project cutting wood . June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin336)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Marilyn Dowling preparing greenhouse at McCue house. March, 1983. (Ref. no. bin337)
Photo by: Daniel Brown

Abbe, Edward H.

Edward H. Abbe Papers, 1828-2004.
22 boxes (28.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 736

Ed Abbe in Bora Bora, 1987
Ed Abbe in Bora Bora, 1987

Born in Syracuse, N.Y., in 1915 and raised largely in Hampton, Va., Edward Abbe seemed destined to be an engineer. The great nephew of Elihu Thomson, an inventor and founding partner in General Electric, and grandson of Edward Folger Peck, an early employee of a precursor of that firm, Abbe came from a family with a deep involvement in electrification and the development of street railways. After prepping at the Rectory and Kent Schools, Abbe studied engineering at the Sheffield School at Yale, and after graduation in 1938, accepted a position with GE. For 36 years, he worked in the Industrial Control Division in New York and Virginia, spending summers at the family home on Martha’s Vineyard. After retirement in 1975, he and his wife Gladys traveled frequently, cruising both the Atlantic and Pacific.

Ranging from an extensive correspondence from his high school and college days to materials relating to his family’s involvement in engineering, the Abbe collection offers an in depth perspective on an educated family. An avid traveler and inveterate keeper, Ed Abbe gathered a diverse assemblage of letters, diaries, and memorabilia relating to the history of the Abbe, Peck, Booth, Gifford, and Boardman families. The collection is particularly rich in visual materials, including albums and photographs, depicting homes, travel, and family life over nearly a century.

Subjects
  • Abbe family
  • Boardman family
  • Booth family
  • Electrical engineers
  • General Electric
  • Gifford family
  • Kent School--Students
  • Peck family
  • Rectory School--Students
  • Yale University--Students
Contributors
  • Abbe, Edward H
  • Abbe, Gladys Howard
  • Abbe, William Parker
  • Peck, Edward F
  • Peck, Mary Booth
Types of material
  • Diaries
  • Letters (Correspondence)
  • Photographs

Acker, Bonnie

Bonnie Acker Collection, 1983-2000.
1 box (1.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 582

A collection of t-shirts, gift cards, and posters designed by activist and political artist Bonnie Acker. Each item features an illustration by Acker in support of various issues relating to social change ranging from peace with Nicaragua, to nuclear abolition and from lifting the debt of impoverished countries, to the Burlington, Vermont community land trust.

Subjects
  • Antinuclear movement--United States
  • Peace movements
Contributors
  • Acker, Bonnie
Types of material
  • Realia

Agriculture

Founded under the Morrill Land Grant Act of 1862 as the Massachusetts Agricultural College, UMass Amherst has long been dedicated to the study and teaching of agriculture and the natural sciences. One of two land grant institutions in the Commonwealth (along with MIT), the university has played an important role in the development of scientific agriculture in New England and has been a major factor in agricultural instruction through its classes and extension service.

SCUA’s collections contain a wealth of information on the history of agriculture and related fields, including horticulture, botany, entomology, animal husbandry, gardening, and landscape design. The strength of the collection lies in documenting the development of American agricultural sciences with an emphasis upon the northeastern states, but it is supplemented with numerous works on British, French, and German agriculture. Adding additional depth are the records of the several departments at UMass Amherst charged with instruction in the agricultural sciences and the papers of individual agricultural educators.

Currently, SCUA is particularly interested in documenting the growth of organic agriculture, heritage breeds, and the practices of sustainable living.

Significant Manuscript collections (view all)

  • Agricultural education
    • Papers of faculty members at Massachusetts Agricultural College and UMass Amherst, as well as educational organizations dedicated to instruction in the agricultural sciences. Among the individuals represented are the agricultural educator, Kenyon Butterfield; Levi Stockbridge, the first farm manager and long-time instructor at MAC; and William Smith Clark, William Penn Brooks, and William Wheeler, who were instrumental in the 1870s in establishing the agricultural college in Hokkaido, Japan.
  • Farming and rural life
    • Correspondence, farm accounts, and other records of farming and rural life, primarily in New England, as well as materials relating to the sociology of rural life.
  • Botany and horticulture
    • Collections relating to the scientific study of botany, horticulture, forestry, and related sciences.
  • Landscape and gardening
    • The papers and photographs of the landscape designer Frank Waugh, and other collections.
  • Other natural sciences
    • Including entomology and geology.

Printed works: Collecting areas

  • Agriculture
    • Early works through the late nineteenth century on agriculture in America, Britain, and Europe, including those by John Fitzherbert, Thomas Hale, Arthur Young, “Columella,” John Smith, Gervase Markham, et al.
  • Animal husbandry
    • Works on sheep culture in the United States (Robert R. Livingston, Samuel Bard) and England (Lord Somerville, John Lawrence); dairy and beef cattle, horses, poultry science.
  • Beekeeping and entomology
    • Among the earliest rare books acquired by the Massachusetts Agricultural Library were a collections of rare books in beekeeping, including key works by Thomas Hill, John Keys, Daniel Wildman, Henry Eddy, from the late 17th through late 19th centuries. Works by Maria Sibylla Merian, John Curtis, Dru Drury, Johann Jakob Romer, Jacob l’Admiral
  • Botany and Silviculture
    • Important works on American botany by Frederick Pursh, Thomas Nuttall, Humphry Marshall’s Arbustrum Americanum, François André Michaux, early editions of Linnaeus
  • Gardening and landscape design
    • Three editions of Bernard M’Mahon’s American Gardener’s Calendar, William Cobbett, Alexander Jackson Davis, Humphry Repton, and others.
  • Genetics, eugenics, animal breeding
    • Essentially compete runs of Eugenics Quarterly, and key works in eugenics.
  • Pomology, viticulture, and fruit culture
    • William Prince, William Coxe, William Chorlton, et al.

Electronic resources

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