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Results for: “Bloom, Marshall, 1944-1969” (215 collections)
SCUA

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Chamberlin, Judi, 1944-2010

Judi Chamberlin Papers, ca.1970-2010.
23 boxes (34.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 768

Judi Chamberlin, 2000
Judi Chamberlin, 2000

A pioneer in the psychiatric survivors’ movement, Judi Chamberlin spent four decades as an activist for the civil rights of mental patients. After several voluntary hospitalizations for depression as a young woman, Chamberlin was involuntarily committed for the only time in 1971, having been diagnosed with schizophrenia. Her experiences in the mental health system galvanized her to take action on patients’ rights, and after attending a meeting of the newly formed Mental Patients’ Liberation Project in New York, she helped found the Mental Patients’ Liberation Front in Cambridge, Mass. Explicitly modeled on civil rights organizations of the time, she became a tireless advocate for the patient’s perspective and for choice in treatment. Her book, On Our Own: Patient Controlled Alternatives to the Mental Health System (1978), is considered a key text in the intellectual development of the movement. Working internationally, she became an important figure in several other organizations, including the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilition at Boston University, the Ruby Rogers Advocacy Center, the National Disability Rights Network, and the National Empowerment Center. In recognition of her advocacy, she was awarded the Distinguished Service Award by the President’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities in 1992, the David J. Vail National Advocacy Award, and the 1995 Pike Prize, which honors those who have given outstanding service to people with disabilities. Chamberlin died of pulmonary disease at home in Arlington, Mass., in January 2010.

An important record of the development of the psychiatric survivors’ movement from its earliest days, the Chamberlin Papers include rich correspondence between Chamberlin, fellow activists, survivors, and medical professionals; records of her work with the MPLF and other rights organizations, conferences and meetings, and her efforts to build the movement internationally.

Subjects
  • Antipsychiatry
  • Ex-mental patients
  • People with disabilities--Civil rights
  • People with disabilities--Legal status, laws, etc.
Contributors
  • Mental Patients Liberation Front
  • Mental Patients Liberation Project
  • National Empowerment Center
Types of material
  • Videotapes

2001 Center/Renaissance Community (part 3)

Nursery outing; kids with Larry Raffel, November, 1976 (Ref. no. bin257)
House eventually belonging to the Edson family, 1983. (Ref. no. bin258)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Greenhouse at Brian McCue’s house, June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin259)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Michael Rapunzel on [unknown] TV talk show, 1977. (Ref. no. bin260)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Donna Liebmann performing at local festival on land, 1977. (Ref. no. bin261)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Michael Rapunzel and Steven Greenwald’s house under construction, August, 1979. (Ref. no. bin262)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Noble Feast interior. Turners Falls, 1978. (Ref. no. bin263)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Construction detail of Michael’s house, 1980. (Ref. no. bin264)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Frog Hunters at the swimming hole. Ariel Brown and Zach Vaughn, July, 1983. (Ref. no. bin265)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Jim Sullivan, 1979. (Ref. no. bin266)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Noble Feast exterior. Turners Falls, 1977. (Ref. no. bin267)
Photo by: Gary Cohen
Greenhouse interior at Brian McCue’s house. June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin268)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Long view of the Lodge. June, 1981. (Ref. no. bin269)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
View of the Warwick house. House in rear is on the site of the former Dorm. Warwick, 1988. (Ref. no. bin270)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Swimming hole at 2001 Center. August, 1982. (Ref. no. bin271)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Gladiolas in bloom near McCue house. July, 1982. (Ref. no. bin272)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Frog Hunters in action. Ariel Brown, Crymson Sullivan, Krishna Lennon. May, 1982. (Ref. no. bin273)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Andrew Bush and friend. June 1983. (Ref. no. bin274)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Working in the garden between Michael and McCue houses. June, 1982. (Ref. no. bin275)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
McCue’s house. June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin276)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
View of Marilyn Dowling’s garden between Michael and McCue houses. June, 1983 (Ref. no. bin277)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance members celebrating at Getting to the Same Place festival. New Hampshire, May, 1979. (Ref. no. bin278)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
ICRY [Inner-City Roundtable of Youth], New York City street gang organization gathering at Lodge, 1981. (Ref. no. bin279)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Alan Harris in Punk-phase, Marilyn Dowling outside the Barn, 1982. (Ref. no. bin280)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
2001 Center cornfield, 1981. (Ref. no. bin281)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Frolic by the swimming hole. May, 1982. (Ref. no. bin282)
Photo by: Daniel Brown

2001 Center/Renaissance Community (part 4)

The Lodge, 1982. (Ref. no. bin283)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
McCue house. August, 1983. (Ref. no. bin284)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Peter and Eileen Caddy, founders of Findhorn Community, with Michael Rapunzel. The Lodge, June, 1976. (Ref. no. bin285)
The Barn, 1981. (Ref. no. bin286)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Doug Edson, 1979. (Ref. no. bin287)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Barn construction with Steve Miller, 1980. (Ref. no. bin288)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Marilyn Dowling working on Michael’s house, 1979. (Ref. no. bin289)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Woodpile. The Lodge was heated by a wood furnace. May, 1979. (Ref. no. bin290)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Meeting on the ridge above Lodge. August, 1982. (Ref. no. bin291)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Pumpkin field below Michael’s house. September, 1981. (Ref. no. bin292)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Rocket’s Silver Train bus with Justin Jaquay, 1979. (Ref. no. bin293)
McCue house under construction, 1977. (Ref. no. bin294)
Peter Caddy with Michael Rapunzel before lecture in Theater. Turners Falls, 1979. (Ref. no. bin295)
Margie McClure, Ivan Senior, Betsy Sullivan, Karen Barry, 1981. (Ref. no. bin296)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Mobile Feast food concession at Supersession concert. Renee Fenner, Steve Wolfson. July, 1977 (Ref. no. bin297)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Evening at the swimming hole, 1982. (Ref. no. bin298)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Cornfield in bloom, August 1981. (Ref. no. bin299)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Saturday Work Day project at the Lodge, August, 1982. (Ref. no. bin300)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Cheryl Termo with kids. June, 1983. (Ref. no. bin301)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Office in Barn with Sandra Jaquay-Wilson. (Ref. no. bin302)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Tilling the land with Bill Stone on tractor. April, 1983. (Ref. no. bin303)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Class of 1981. (Ref. no. bin304)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Garden scene, 1983. (Ref. no. bin305)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Sunday morning at the Lodge. Debby Stone, Bill and Monica Grabin, 1979. (Ref. no. bin306)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Barn under construction, 1979. (Ref. no. bin307)
Photo by: Daniel Brown
Renaissance Greeting Cards booth at trade show with Melvin Weiner. New York City, 1979. (Ref. no. bin308)
Photo by: Daniel Brown

Abramson, Doris E.

Doris E. Abramson Papers, ca.1930-2007.
(25 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 127

Doris Abramson
Doris Abramson

After earning her masters degree from Smith College in 1951, Doris Abramson (class of 1949) returned to UMass in 1953 to become instructor in the English Department, remaining at her alma mater through a long and productive career. An historian of theatre and poet, she was a founding member of the Speech Department, Theatre Department, and the Massachusetts Review. In 1959, a Danforth grant helped Abramson pursue doctoral work at Columbia. Published in 1969, her dissertation, Negro Playwrights in the American Theatre, 1925-1969, was a pioneering work in the field. After her retirement, she and her partner of more than 40 years, Dorothy Johnson, ran the Common Reader Bookshop in New Salem.

An extensive collection covering her entire career, Abramson’s papers are a valuable record of the performing arts at UMass, her research on African American playwrights, her teaching and directing, and many other topics relating to her diverse interests in literature and the arts.

Subjects
  • African-American theater
  • Poets--Massachusetts
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Theater
Contributors
  • Abramson, Doris E.

African American history

Founders of the Niagara Movement, ca.1905
Founders of the Niagara Movement,
ca.1905

The acquisition of the papers of W.E.B. Du Bois in 1972 established SCUA as a center for research in African American history. In subsequent years, the University of Massachusetts has supported the publication of three volumes of Dr. Du Bois’ correspondence and SCUA has served as a resource for many dozens of scholarly articles and books on Du Bois and his legacy. SCUA has also made efforts to build around the Du Bois collection, adding other important printed and manuscript materials both in African American history and in the history of efforts to promote social change.

Beyond Du Bois, significant collections in African American history include the papers of the abolitionist Hudson Family of Northampton, the expatriate playwright Gordon Heath, the sociologist, educator, and former president of Lincoln University, Horace Mann Bond.

Each February, in commemoration of Dr. Du Bois’s birthday, SCUA and the Du Bois Department of Afro-Americans Studies at UMass co-sponsor a colloquium on Du Bois and his legacy. Our lecturers have included distinguished scholars such as Herbert Aptheker, Randolph Bromery, Clayborne Carson, and David Levering Lewis.

Significant collections

Albertson, Dean

Dean Albertson Collection of Oral History Transcripts and Student Papers, 1975-1977.
1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 224

Dean Albertson’s 384-level History classes at the University of Massachusetts Amherst conducted interviews with social activists of the 1960s and early 1970s, participants and observers in the Springfield, Massachusetts North End riots of 1975, and war and nuclear power resisters. The collection includes transcripts of 15 interviews conducted during the years 1975-1977, as well as the students’ papers, which put the transcripts into context. See also the Dean Albertson Papers (FS 109).

Subjects
  • Antinuclear movement--Massachusetts
  • Attica Correctional Facility
  • Civil rights--Massachusetts--Hampden County
  • Demonstrations--Massachusetts--Chicopee
  • Hampden County (Mass.) Civil Liberties Union
  • History--Study and teaching (Higher)--Massachusetts--Amherst
  • Police shootings--Massachusetts--Springfield
  • Political activists--Massachusetts
  • Prison riots--New York (State)--Attica
  • Puerto Ricans--Massachusetts--Springfield
  • Riots--Massachusetts--Springfield
  • Selma-Montgomery Rights March, 1965
  • Springfield (Mass.)--History
  • Springfield (Mass.)--Race relations
  • Springfield (Mass.)--Social conditions
  • Springfield Area Movement for a Democratic Society
  • Venceremos Brigade
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest movements--Massachusetts--Springfield
  • Weatherman (Organization)
  • Welfare rights movement--Massachusetts--Springfield
  • Westover Air Force Base (Mass.)
Contributors
  • Albertson, Dean, 1920-
  • Lecodet, Rafael
Types of material
  • Oral histories

American Morgan Horse Association

American Morgan Horse Association Registry Records, 1911-1981.
119 boxes (150 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 781

Morgan horses at MAC
Morgan horses at MAC

In 1789, Vermont native Justin Morgan acquired a bay colt in Springfield, Mass., that became the progenitor of a distinctly American breed of general purpose horse. Noted for its stamina, strength, disposition, and beauty, the Morgan became widely popular in western Massachusetts and Vermont, eventually spreading nationally and internationally. To support the breed, the Morgan Horse Club (later the American Morgan Horse Association) was founded in 1909 and today maintains the breed registry, publishes The Morgan Horse magazine, and offers a wide range of public information and educational services.

The Registry records of the AMHA are a product of concern during the late 19th century for documenting and preserving the integrity of the Morgan breed and a means for breeders to certify pedigrees for their stock. In 1894, Joseph Battell published the first volume of the Morgan Horse and Register containing nearly 1,000 pages of pedigrees for “any meritorious stallion, mare, or gelding tracing in direct male line to Justin Morgan and having at least 1/64 of his blood,” and although standards have been modified since, the registry remains the primary source for documenting the history of the breed. The records in this collection include approved applications for the AMHA registry, including pedigrees and supporting materials.

Subjects
  • Horses--Breeding
  • Morgan horse

American Writing Paper Company

American Writing Paper Company Records, 1851-1960.
19 boxes (9.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 062

Paper company based in Holyoke, Massachusetts that at one time controlled 75% of the total United States fine paper output. Records include board of directors’ minutes, by-laws, blueprints, land transactions, merger agreements, and publications. Labor files (1936-1960) comprise the bulk of the collection and include contracts, correspondence, grievances, and negotiations.

Subjects
  • Collective bargaining--Paper industry--Massachusetts--Holyoke
  • Holyoke (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Holyoke (Mass.)--Economic conditions--20th century
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts--Holyoke
  • Paper industry workers--Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Paper industry--Massachusetts--Holyoke
  • Strikes and lockouts--Paper industry--Massachusetts--Holyoke
Contributors
  • American Writing Paper Company
Types of material
  • Blueprints
  • Photographs

Amherst Community Association (Amherst, Mass.)

Amherst Community Association Records, 1939-1978.
5 boxes (2 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 050

Contains bylaws, incorporation papers, minutes, budgets, reports, and correspondence relating to the administration and fundraising activities of the Amherst Community Association, including the Community Chest fund drive. Also included are budget proposals and agency profiles documenting organizations such as the Amherst Boys Club and Girls Club, Children’s Aid and Family Service, Hampshire County Association for Retarded Citizens and Camp Anderson.

Subjects
  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Camp Anderson
  • Social service--Massachusetts--Amherst
Contributors
  • Amherst Boys' Club (Amherst, Mass.)
  • Amherst Community Association (Amherst, Mass.)
  • Amherst Girls' Club (Amherst, Mass.)
  • Children's Aid and Family Service of Hampshire County (Hampshire County, Mass.)
  • Hampshire County Association for Retarded Citizens (Hampshire County, Mass.)
  • Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children

Anglin family

Anglin Family Papers, 1874-1955 (Bulk: 1914-1926).
2 boxes (1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 699

Anglin family and friends, ca.1921
Anglin family and friends, ca.1921

Born in Cork, Ireland to a prosperous family, the Anglin siblings began immigrating to Canada and the United States in 1903. The first to relocate to Canada, brothers Will and Sydney pursued vastly different careers, one as a Presbyterian minister and the other as a salesman at a Toronto slaughterhouse. George and Crawford both served in the military during World War I, the former in the British Infantry as a medical officer and the latter in the 4th University Overseas Company first in France and later in Belgium where he died saving the life of a wounded soldier. Gladys Anglin trained as a nurse, but worked in a Canadian department store and at the Railway Office before suffering a mental breakdown and entering the Ontario Hospital as a patient. Ethel remained in Ireland the longest where she taught Domestic Economics at a technical school. The only Anglin to immigrate to the United States and the only female sibling to marry, Ida and husband David Jackson settled in Monson, Massachusetts where they raised four daughters.

The Anglin siblings were part of a close knit family who stayed in contact despite their geographic separation through their correspondence. Siblings wrote and exchanged lengthy letters that document not only family news, but also news of local and national significance. Topics addressed in their letters include World War I, the Irish revolution, medicine, religious ministry, and domestic issues from the ability of a single woman to support herself through work to child rearing.

Subjects
  • Anglin family--Correspondence
  • Ireland--Emigration and immigration--History
  • Ireland--History--War of Independence, 1919-1921
  • Irish--Canada--History
  • Irish--United States--History
  • World War, 1914-1918
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